GEN-199 General Elective (100 Level)

    Course to be used in transfer or study abroad translations for courses with no one-to-one match/equivalency

    GEN-299 General Elective (200 Level)

    Course to be used for transfer and study abroad translations for courses with no one-to-one match/equivalency

    GEN-399 General Elective (300 Level)

    Course to be used in transfer and study abroad translations for courses with no one-to-one match/equivalency

    GEN-499 General Elective (400 Level)

    Course to be used for transfer and study abroad translations for courses with no one-to-one match/equivalency

    IDS-001 Abroad: Scepter'd Isle

    IDS-010 ID Assignment

    This course will be used as a "holding course" in order to pre-register students and assign IDs, network log-ins and webadvisor access.

    IDS-100 Perspectives on Education and Culture

    Assists first-year students in making a successful transition to college life. The course has three overlapping themes: becoming an intentional learner, becoming a Notre Dame woman, and acquiring global and intercultural fluency. Each student will examine and reflect upon various aspects of her life, including her relationship to other students, the institution and the community (understanding culture, appreciating diversity). Students will have the opportunity to develop personal, academic, and leadership skills and habits that will enhance their college experiences and promote lifelong learning. Required for first-year traditional age students and transfer students with fewer than 12 credits. [3 credits]

    IDS-100L Emerging Leaders Lab

    Fosters personal awareness and development central to learning to be a leader capable of fostering positive social change in society. Emerging Leaders Lab enables students to articulate their mission, discern their preferred leadership style, practice key interpersonal communication skills, and work effectively with individuals from a variety of backgrounds and in groups. Students focus on developing self-knowledge and skill in time and stress management, conflict resolution, ethical decision making and conduct in professional settings. [1 credit]

    IDS-101 Study Abroad Courses

    IDS-105 Dimensions of College Skills, Learning and Achievement

    Provides students with assessments of skills in writing, reading and mathematics which then are integrated into customized coaching for each student. The class stresses communication and integrated into customized coaching for each student. The class stresses communication and quantitative problem solving readiness for academic success in first-year entry-level studies. Connections between career aspirations and choice of acdemic major will be explored with the guidance of faculty, academic success coaches and career development professionals. [ 3 credits ]

    IDS-150 Introduction to Women's Studies

    Helps students examine the differing meanings of feminism based on readings and films from a variety of disciplinary perspectives. Examines how race, ethnicity, class, age, ability and sexual orientation shape women's points of commonality and difference. Includes a service-learning project involving incarcerated women. Fulfills general education requirement in gender studies. [3 credits]

    IDS-160 Introduction to Peace Studies

    This is an introduction to peace and justice studies. The course focuses on negative peace (i.e., eliminating direct violence, including war) as well as positive peace building (fostering an equitable economic system and ecological balance). The course analyzes the roots of violence and inequity as well antidotes to these problems. Fulfills general education requirement in cross-cultural studies and history. [3 credits]

    IDS-171 Hnrs: Mathemenglish

    IDS-172 Honors: The Axial Age: Philosophy of East and West

    Considers the new ways of thought that emerged in the ancient Near East, Greece, India and China during the first millennium B.C. ("the axial age"). Thinkers reconsidered basic areas of concern-the transcendent, human nature, the family, society, government, knowledge, the past and death-in relation to the pre-existing culture. For example, this re-interpretation of tradition led to the rise of Biblical Judaism in the Near East; classical philosophy in Greece; the Upanishads and Buddhism in India; and Confucianism and Daoism in China. In this seminar, students discuss the thought of the "axial age," compare ideas across civilizations and learn how to write philosophical essays. Prerequisite: Morrissy scholar or permission. Fulfills general education requirement in 200 level philosophy. [3 credits]

    IDS-190 General Elective (CND Credit)

    IDS-199 Interdisciplinary Elective

    IDS-200 Foundations of Leadership for Women

    Presents an interdisciplinary approach to developing leadership skills in a world of social change. Students will examine multiple leadership paradigms with a focus on models that are inclusive, empowering, purposeful, ethical and process-oriented. They will critically examine their own perceptions about leadership; identify relevant leadership attitudes, behaviors and skills; and apply leadership knowledge through a variety of experiences including self-assessment, skill development, service-learning and small group team activities. Prerequisite: IDS 100L. [3 credits]

    IDS-215 Women As Mentors

    IDS-222 American Sign Language

    IDS-226 Why Care? Justice and Service

    Provides students with an opportunity to study the University's mission of social responsibility through readings and discussion. Students will also develop a hands-on understanding of what it means to be a socially-responsible citizen through a service-learning experience. [3 credits]

    IDS-230 Career Decision Making Seminar

    A readings and discussion course which will focus on career development theories and applications. Students will learn strategies to help them choose a major and/or career, identify interests, skills and values, develop effective job-hunting and career advancement strategies. Career assessment and resume construction are included.

    IDS-231 Honors: The Science of Science Fiction

    Considers science fiction as a literature of ideas-the ideas of modern science. Selects contemporary science fiction writers and film makers in order to gain a perspective on the development of a fiction of scientific ideas and a prophecy of future technological change. Employs reading, film and the campus planetarium. Prerequisite: Morrissy scholar or permission. [3 credits]

    IDS-235 Decision Points: Major, Career, Vocation

    Course explores the synergy between the choice of major and career and how these decisions inform life vocation. Students are challenged to explore the difference between making alife and making a living, reflecting on the University mission's call to transform the world. The course will include discussions of lives of change-makers in society who did not complete traditional career paths. Practical career planning workshops will be incorporated into the work of the course. [ 3 credits ]

    IDS-253 Hrs: Business Lat Amer

    IDS-261 Internship Exploration

    An experiential option which allows for the exploration of majors and career fields through a monitored work placement. Students work with their academic advisor to identify objectives for the experience and submit a career-related assignment to the Career Center as part of the course. Prerequisites: Completed 30 credits, attended a Career Center Internship Orientation workshop, minimum sophomore status, and academic advisor's permission. 2, 3, or 4 credits.

    IDS-271 Honors: Romanticism: The Beautiful Infinite

    Analyzes seminal works of the 19th century Romantic movement in the fields of art and music. The relatedness of the two forms is revealed through discovery of common themes running through works of the Romantic period-the emancipation of the individual, the love of nature, nationalism, and fondness for the fantastic and the exotic. Common qualities of expression found among the two art forms during the period also emerge, providing a holistic sense of the intellectual and artistic atmosphere of the times. Opportunities for visits to museums, concerts, and theatre or opera performances are provided. Prerequisite: Morrissy scholar or permission. Fulfills general education requirement in fine arts. [3 credits]

    IDS-273 Honors: Living in the New Millenium

    Explores life in the new millennium: what has been, what is now and what is to come. Examines questions of political and social movements, population growth, cultural diversity, emergent economics, technological change, biological engineering and space exploration in the first 50 years of the 21st century. Prerequisite: Morrissy scholar or permission. [ 3 credits ]

    IDS-299 Degree Audit - Minor Course Requirement

    IDS-300 Found of Leadership for Women

    The course presents an interdisciplinary approach to developing leadership skills in a world of social change. Students will examine multiple leadership paradigms with a focus on models that are inclusive, empowering, purposeful, ethical, and process-oriented. They will critically examine their own perceptions about leadership, identify relevant leadership attitutdes, behaviors, and skills, and apply leadership knowledge through skill development, service learning, and small group team activities. Women's College students must have completed the Emerging Leaders program and transfer, CE, and WEC students should have completed BUS 302 Principles of Management. 3 credits.

    IDS-307 American Sign Language II

    IDS-308 American Sign Language III

    IDS-310 Service Abroad: Women in Leadership and Service

    Service abroad is an independent, self-sustaining course which enhances all departments and programs. It is another opportunity for Notre Dame women to further expand their knowledge of the world and their self-giving. Service Abroad immerses the participant more deeply into the culture of another country. Prerequisite: Completion of required independent study/lab with a grade of B and Junior/Senior standing. Fulfills general education requirement in cross-cultural studies. [3 credits]

    IDS-310L Service Abroad Lab: Women in Leadership and Service

    This independent study, prior to the actual service, introduces the student to the history, culture and language of the country where she will give service. The exact content of the course is determined by the instructor and depends on the student's knowledge and level of preparation. Prerequisite: Permission of program director. Fulfills general education requirement in cross-cultural studies. [1 credit]

    IDS-325 Hrs: Educating Women: Amer Exp

    This course examines the educational experience of women in the United States in the 19th and 20th centuries. Students survey ideas, attitudes and arguments about the education of women; explore the history of academies and women's colleges, coeducation in public and private schools and colleges, and the uniquely American expansion of educational and professional opportunities for women. Includes the work of pioneers and contemporary leaders. Prerequisite: Morrissy Scholar or permission. 3 credits.

    IDS-327 Hrs: Anglo-Saxon England

    IDS-340 Introduction to Catholic Studies

    Provides an overview of various dimensions of the Roman Catholic faith, including Catholic practices, histories, cultures and doctrines. Topics to be considered are: Catholic spirituality and institutions, Catholic ecumenism and inter-religious dialogue, Catholicism and the arts, sciences and social action; the history of the Catholic Church, global Catholicism, contemporary Catholic theology, and the future of the Catholic Church. Prerequisite: RST-201. Fulfills general education requirement for 300/400-level religious studies.

    IDS-360 Feminist & Queer Theory

    IDS-361 Career Internship

    Combines the experiential component of an on-site professional work placement with an interdisciplinary consideration of work-related issues. Focus of the course is on integrating the academic component with work experience through reflection, class discussion and assignments. Prerequisites: Completed 30 credits, attended an Academic Career and Enrichment Center internship orientation workshop, minimum sophomore status, and academic advisor's permission. [2, 3 or 4 credits]

    IDS-369 Honors: Genethics

    Provides students with the opportunity to understand and evaluate various religious and philosophical positions and arguments on a range of contemporary moral issues related to biotechnology. Explores the science of genetics and its application to the fields of biology, technology and medicine. Examines selected topics in the ethics of genetic testing, research, drugs and therapy. Prerequisite: Morrissy scholar or permission; RST-201. Fulfills general education requirements for 300/400 level religious studies and values. [3 credits]

    IDS-371 Hrs: Power of Ideas

    IDS-373 Honors: Cosmos and Creation: Religion and Science

    Explores the relationship between religion and science as bodies of knowledge, modes of inquiry, and ways of knowing. Examines the complex history of science and religion as social institutions in various degrees of cooperation and tension. Areas of inquiry will include theology, spirituality, scientific theories, and philosophy of science, as well as the intersection of these areas at key historical moments such as the Copernican revolution, natural selection, and the development of quantum physics. Prerequisite: RST 201. Fulfills general education requirement for 300/400 level religious studies. [3 credits]

    IDS-376 Hrs: Family Bonds

    IDS-377 Hrs: Heritage Civ & Jew

    IDS-378 Honors: The Holocaust

    Explores the roots of anti-Semitism and the rise to power of the Nazis. Considers the development of the German policies toward the Jews, from economic discrimination to planned extermination, the fate of Jews in various countries under German control, and the possibility of resistance and opportunities for rescue. Prerequisite: Morrissy scholar or permission. [3 credits]

    IDS-380  Research Apprentice

    Introduces an academically-based didactic experience in which the student is trained in the methods of research at the college level for a specific discipline. The student serves as a research apprentice to a faculty mentor within the student's academic discipline. There is an interdisciplinary monthly seminar for all apprentices, an experiential student research component, weekly office hours and weekly supervision with the faculty mentor. Permission of instructor and research mentor. [1, 2, or 3 credits: 10 semester hours for 1 credit; 20 semester hours for 2 credits; or 30 semester hours for 3 credits]

    IDS-399 Placeholder Spot for 3-2 Students

    placeholder in which to register 3-2 students for tracking purposes

    IDS-400 Study Abroad

    IDS-410 Seminar: Leadership and Social Change

    Helps students integrate previous academic and experiential learning to address a contemporary social issue, and develop workable and innovative solutions to tackle some aspect of that social issue. With coordinator approval, students may take the seminar portion of the course along with a relevant senior-level practicum in their major. [3 credits]

    IDS-411 Topics: Green Baltimore

    Through an intensive seminar and discussion format, this course will consider the "green movement" and sustainability initiatives with particular attention to the Greater Baltimore area. Topics will include green business practices, sustainability and the environmental climate in Maryland, green science, the debate on global warming and related questions, and the role of modern communications media in the public debate on these matters. [ 3 credits ]

    IDS-412 Special Topics/IDS

    IDS-427 Study Tour

    IDS-430 Science and Health Policy: Critical Issues

    Provides opportunities for students to attend a Washington, D.C. seminar to learn first-hand from women scientists, leading health experts, medical researchers, and pharmaceutical representatives who are shaping our nation's agenda in this critical policy arena. Speakers are drawn from a variety of agencies and organizations including the National Science Foundation, National Institutes of Health, and the National Research Council. Field trips to some government agencies. Students need to register in two placed to attend the seminar and receive college credit. Students must register for the Winterim course at NDMU (IDS-430) and they must also complete a registration from www.plen.org. [3 credits]

    IDS-440 Senior Seminar in Women's Studies

    Explores issues concerning women through research and research methodologies that use and apply multidisciplinary feminist theory. This is the culminating capstone seminar for the community of women's studies scholars. Prerequisites: IDS-150, two women's studies electives or permission of instructor. [3 credits]

    IDS-450 Seminar Experience: Peace and Justice

    Provides students with a focused seminar experience that allows them to consider the coursework for the minor through the acquired lens of peace and justice studies. Prerequisite: IDS-160. [3 credits]

    IDS-455 Seminar in Catholic Studies

    Serves as the capstone for the Catholic Studies minor. As such, it provides students with a focused seminar experience that encourages substantial guided research on a topic in Catholic Studies mutually agreed upon by student and professor. May include a service learning component. Prerequisite: IDS-340. [3 credits]

    IDS-461 Professional Internship

    Combines an on-site professional work placement with opportunities to reflect on the work experience as it relates to the student's overall academic program. The focus of the course is on development of effective job search and networking skills and strategies, career management and advancement, and professional growth and development. Prerequisites: completion of 30 credits, attendance at an Academic Career and Enrichment Center internship orientation workshop, sophomore status, academic advisor permission, completion of IDS-361 or department practicum. [2, 3 or 4 credits]

    IDS-462 Advanced Professional Internship

    Offers a departmentally-monitored, off-campus professional work experience for upper-level students who have completed IDS-461 and do not have a required departmental practicum. Students work with their academic advisor or a designated faculty member to identify objectives for the experience and complete related assignments. Prerequisites: completion of 30 credits, meetings with an Academic Career and Enrichment Center counselor and with one's academic advisor or designated faculty member, sophomore status, academic advisor permission and completion of IDS-461 or department practicum. [2, 3 or 4 credits]

    IDS-471 Honors: Politics and Ethics of War and Peace

    Explores war and peace through an examination of historical conflicts, social science explanations, ethical positions and alternative peace proposals. Considers 20th century conflicts and alternative explanations of war, and the individual, state and international levels. Compares and contrasts ethical positions from several religious and philosophical traditions. Prerequisite: Morrissy scholar or permission and RST-201. Fulfills general education requirements in 300/400 religious studies, values, and history. [3 credits]

    IDS-479 Honors: Philosophy Through Literature

    Takes a fresh look at traditional philosophical problems using classic philosophical texts and literary works that deal with common issues. Considers the questions: What is self? Is there an answer to the problem of evil? Are our actions free or determined? Are there any objective moral values? Is the material world real? Prerequisite: Morrissy scholar or permission. Fulfills general education requirement in 300/400 level philosophy. [3 credits]

    IDS-480 Advanced Research Apprentice

    Expands the academically based didactic experience of IDS-380 in which the student is trained in the methods of research at the college level while serving as a research apprentice to a faculty member within the student's academic discipline. In this second course, the apprentice deepends and broadens skills and techniques related to research project and to demonstrate more independence in executing research. This course provides a unique opportunity for students to train for post-baccalaureate research teaching assistantships through skill development. Prerequisite: IDS-380. [1, 2, or 3 credits: 10 semester hours for 1 credit; 20 semester hours for 2 credits; 30 semester hours for 3 credits]

    IDS-490 Capstone Course

    IDS-496 Teaching Apprentice

    Introduces an academically-based didactic experience in which the student is trained in the philosophy and methods of teaching at the college level for a specific discipline. The student serves as an educational apprentice to a faculty mentor within the student's academic discipline. There is an interdisciplinary monthly seminar for all apprentices, an experiential student teaching component, weekly office hours and weekly supervision with the faculty mentor. Permission of instructor. [3 credits]

    IDS-498 Advanced Teaching Apprentice

    Expands the academically based didactic experience of IDS-496 in which the student is trained in the philosophy and methods of teaching at the college level while serving as an educational apprentice to a faculty member within the student's academic discipline. In this second course, the apprentice develops skills and techniques to assess student work in the content area. This course provides a unique opportunity for students to train for post-baccalaureate teaching or graduate teaching assistantships through skill development. Prerequisite: IDS-496. [3 credits]

    IDS-499 Credits from First BA

    IDS-500 The Human Spirit and the Liberal Arts

    Explores the human quest for meaning and significant aspects of the human experience through study in the liberal arts disciplines of literature, philosophy, religion, the social and natural sciences, and the fine arts. In this multidisciplinary course, students complete assigned readings and write analytic and reflective essays for each class session. A research essay and an in-class final examination are required. [ 3 credits ]

    IDS-501 GRA Degree Audit option

    This course will be used as a placeholder for the LBS concentration courses. Once the advisor and student have determined a concentration and the courses, they will substitute the approved classes for this course.

    IDS-502 Id Assignment for Gra

    This course will be used as a "holding course" in GRA to allow for production of ID assignments and WebAdvisor accounts in IT.

    IDS-505 Physical Changes in Aging

    IDS-507 Topics in Liberal Studies

    IDS-510 Approaches to Contemporary Communication

    Assumes that language is the basis for all communication and examines the nature of language and semiotics through the exploration of recent philosophical thinking. This required course explores communication theory, postmodern art and postmodern fiction through four of the five disciplines in the contemporary communication program: communication arts, philosophy, art and English. The fifth discipline computer science is explored in the required CST-515 course. IDS-510 should be taken within the first 9 credits in the program. [3 credits]

    IDS-511 Topics: Interdisciplinary Studies

    IDS-512 Writing Workshop

    Focuses on one or more areas of writing for a contemporary audience. In the workshop environment writing of students is critiqued and evaluated by the other writers in the course as well as the instructor. Course could focus on journalism, feature writing, writing for popular media, creative nonfiction, the essay, poetry, play-writing, screenwriting, fiction or a combination of genres dependent on the choice and expertise of the instructor. Course may be repeated to explore a different genre. Permission of the instructor will be required to enroll. [3 credits]

    IDS-527 Study Tour

    IDS-544 Mind, Brain and Behavior

    Confronts the relationship between subjective interpretations of such unique characteristics of the human experience as thinking, reasoning, and awareness and the hard, analytical, biological explanations of these processes. Students become more familiar with the biological mechanisms of higher cognitive processes and evaluate whether this model can reasonably account for the human experience. The course also allows students to acquire experience at literature research in the life-sciences. No previous experience in biology or psychology is assumed. [ 3 credits ]

    IDS-546 Exp of Sci/Interdisc Approach

    This course explores the scientific approach as a method of understanding the world, providing students with insights into the intellectual and aesthetic satisfactions that can be derived from science. Students analyze the nature of the scientific method and examine the application of its principles to other areas of human endeavor. 3 credits.

    IDS-547 The Creative Spirit

    Addresses the definition and the demonstration of creativity. The course considers what creativity is, how it is measured and evaluated. It also considers the characteristics of the creative person's personality, how such a person views work, and how he or she produces it. Areas where creativity will be considered will be: the workplace, the sciences, the arts, and literature. The course also allows students to explore their own creativity, but neither the presence nor absence of creativity is a prerequisite. [ 3 credits ]

    IDS-561 Medical Gerontology

    This course uses an interdisciplinary approach to examine the social construction and diverse, current conceptualizations of health and illness in aging. Content focus is on a sociological approach to medical gerontology in contrast to physiological or biological perspectives. 3 credits.

    IDS-562 Life/Aging and Humanities

    This course's unique focus is on aging and the humanities--literature, history, philosophy, art, drama--have contributed to the experience of growing old. Students will explore myths, folk tales, films, historical overviews, philosophical arguments, poetry, stories, artwork and artists, and other works to examine how aging is portrayed and experienced. 3 credits.

    IDS-570 Research Meth/Stu in Aging

    This core course provides an overview of quantitative and qualitative methods used in studies addressing issue of aging. Topics include the formulation of hypotheses, research design, statistical analysis, and report writing. The student may elect to take this course on a Pass/Fail or Grade basis. Those students interested in pursuing advanced study beyond the Master's Degree are encouraged to take the later option.

    IDS-573 Topics: Studies in Aging

    This course examines selected topics and issues in aging which reflect contemporary discoveries and thinking in gerontology and adult development. IDS 573 may be taken more than once under different topics. 3 credits.

    IDS-574 Psyche and Spirit

    Explores both the basic need to understand the mysteries of life and the role of spiritual and moral values in ego development. Reviews how personality theorists place spiritual development in the description of maturity. Students are encouraged to challenge their own traditional beliefs and faith systems in the light of personal experience. [ 3 credits ]

    IDS-575 Legal Issues and Aging

    Education about U.S. laws and planning for later life can ease the transitions in "old" age. This course will look at legislation that addresses the legal rights and needs of the aging population. Topics covered include: the need for and availability of legal services; the role and obligations of the lawyer; personal autonomy and voluntary and involuntary limitations on autonomy; guardianships and alternatives to guardianship; end of life decisions (advance health care planning, proxy decision-making and the "right to die"); Medicare, Medicaid, Medigap, long-term care insurance and estate planning; nursing homes and laws that regulate them; consumer protection and scams aimed at the elderly; elder abuse and protective services; discrimination in employment and against those with disabilities. 3 credits.

    IDS-577 Death and Dying

    This course examines the events surrounding the last phase of the life course. The focus is both on the individual who is preparing for that final exit, as well as on the circle of family and friends who witness the slow or sudden departure of a loved one then mourn their loss. Topics include: pain management, hospice care, ethical and legal issues, psychosocial developmental theories such as Kubler-Ross and Byock, and the significance of spirituality. 3 credits.

    IDS-580 Intro Hist Research/Interp

    This is the first in a series of interdisciplinary courses, with history as the integrating discipline, designed for middle/high school teachers of social studies. The course has a dual purpose: to broaden teachers' command of content knowledge in American history, and or instructional methods and resources for imparting this knowledge to middle/high school students. Participants in this course will choose one of two topics for intensive investigation: World War II and the U.S. role in this global conflict or Pre-Colonial Indians of North America. Course participants will be exposed to a number of teaching methodologies appropriate to the social studies classroom and will practice and refine skills and processes central to historical research and interpretation. Permission of academic advisor required for registration.

    IDS-581 Disc Hist/Hist Investigation

    This is the second in a series of interdisciplinary courses, with history as the integrating discipline, designed for middle/high school teachers of social studies. The course has a dual purpose: to broaden teachers' command of content knowldge in American history, and of instructional methods and resources for imparting this knowledge to middle/high school students. This course will immerse participants in an in depth study of the African-American experience following the Civil War. Participants will learn how to interpret primary sources, artifacts, and other historical materials at the heart of historical investigation, and the pedagogy for engaging middle.high school students in similar endeavor. Permission of academic advisor required for registration.

    IDS-582 Citizen and Constitution

    A course designed to connect the philosophical underpinnings, the historical context of origin, the salient values, and the evolving interpretation of the U.S. Constitution to the lives and concerns of the nation's citizenry. Lectures, readings, discussions, simulations, research assignments, and writing exercises will create a highly interactive environment for achieving the goal of the course. Attention also will be given to the pedagogy of teaching about the Constitution to middle/high school students. Permission of academic adivsor required for registration.

    IDS-583 History/Expos Text & Lit

    Teaching History Through Expository Text and Literature Industrialism and Social Reform will teach participants strategies to captivate student interest in social studies while teaching a host of expository reading skills that students can use for the rest of their lives. Students learn how to connect literature to "real-life experiences" they have in class so that deeper understanding follows. Participants will learn how to assist emerging readers through carefully structured support at each of the four stages of the expository reading process: preview, read, take notes, and review. Additionally, strategies for engaging readers of all ability levels in the study of literature as a means for studying history will be explored.

    IDS-584 History/ Live Appr Mtg Needs

    Differentiated Social Studies Instruction: Meeting the Needs of Every Student offers course participants instruction in a diverse set of instructional practices that allow students with multiple intelligences to experience success in their social studies courses.

    IDS-585 Geographic Perspec in History

    Geographic Perspectives in History will take a thematic approach to exploring the history of Medieval Europe and its transition to the Renaissance and the Age of Exploration. Course participants will learn to facilitate among their students an understanding of the impact of European geography on its inhabitants. Participants will also discover how Europeans initially responded to their immediate environment during the Medieval Era, as well as the relationship between movement and the location of resources as factors leading to the Renaissance and world exploration. Course participants will learn how to more effectively integrate the five themes of geography into their instruction so that students see the relationship between geography and history. Participants will be exposed to a variety of instructional strategies and will receive numerous resources which will aid them in their daily classroom instruction. Participants will also visit museums and historical locations in the region that will later serve them in their classroom participation. 3 credits.

    IDS-586 Economic Trends in History

    Economic Trends in History will provide participants with in-depth knowledge and instructional strategies regarding the world revolutions of the 18th and 19th centuries. This knowledge and associated strategies will be meaningful and effective in the implementation of classroom instruction and will also include access to local educational resources that teachers can continue to use well after the course is completed. Course content will focus on the political, social, and exonomic characteristics inherent in all revolutions. Specific emphasis will be given to the American Revolution, French Revolution, and America's second war for independence, the War of 1812. This course will analyze the decisions that people and countries have made through economic themes, such as supply and demand, opportunity cost, and scarcity as these concepts apply to the revolutionary era.

    IDS-587 Tchg Hist Thr Primary Sources: Cold War

    IDS-588 John Smith Exploration Chesapeake Region

    IDS-597 Master's Seminar

    The seminar treats a broad topic related to the program's theme of the human quest for meaning. Each student, according to her or his interests, chooses a specific topic related to the broader one, researches the topic and writes a lengthy paper. Students present their findings to the class. [ 3 credits ]

    IDS-598 Master's Project

    Offers the student an opportunity to produce, under the direction of a faculty mentor, either a scholarly paper related to the liberal arts or a creative work, such a novel, a play, or a portfolio of paintings. The Master's Project is meant to integrate and build upon previous work in the Liberal Studies program. [ 3 credits ]

    IDS-599 Master's Thesis

    Offers the student an opportunity to investigate, under the direction of a faculty mentor, a specific question or issue of human concern in the liberal arts and, thereby, to produce a research paper using an acceptable research method and design. The Master's Thesis is meant to integrate and build upon previous work in the Liberal Studies program. 6 credits; students register for this course twice. [ 3 credits ]

    IDS-600 Colloquium in Contemporary Communication

    Develops the master's project to integrate and build upon previous work in contemporary communication. Under the direction of a faculty advisor, the student produces a scholarly research manuscript, an original work of creative writing or art, or an original technical/software product. The format and length of the project will be determined with the guidance of the Contemporary Communication Council and the project advisor. Prerequisite: at least 27 credits completed in the program. [3 credits]

    IDS-610 Existential Imagination

    IDS-690 Practicum/Adult/Aging

    The central focus of this course is on the personal learning objectives of the individual student. It consists of supervised work in a human services or health care agency. The purpose of the experience is to allow the student to implement newly acquired skills, obtain additional skills, and/or explore careers in the field of aging. The course requires the student to complete a minimum of 90 hours of field experience during the last year of study. The student will locate the site of the Practicum with collaboration with the Practicum Supervisor. The student will keep a journal during the Practicum and produce a reflection paper at the end of her experience. This couse may be taken over two semesters with permission of the host agency. Prerequisite: Completion of all four core courses and permission of Practicum Coordinator. For Summer placements interviews and arrangements must occur before May 1, for Fall placements the deadline is September 1 and for Spring placments the deadline is November 15. 3 credits.

    IDS-698 Independent Study

    Offers the student the opportunity to work independently, under faculty supervision, in an approved area of study. The nature, scope and design of the project to be completed, as well as a schedule of pre-arranged meetings will be individually contracted between the instructor and the student. Prerequisite: Permission of instructor and dean of Graduate Studies; obtain required form from Graduate Studies office. This course may not be repeated for credit. [ 3 credits ]

    IDS-799 Credits From Case

    MSC-099 Leadership Lab

    MSC-100 Introduction to Tactical Leaders

    MSC-120 Leadership & Personal Development

    MSC-201 Innovative Team Leadership

    MSC-207 Foundation of Tactical Leadership

    MSC-301 Leadership & Tactics I

    MSC-303 Intensive Independent Military Study

    MSC-411 Developing Adaptive Leaders

    NDMU-100 First Year Seminar

    First Year Seminar course (formerly Perspectives in Culture and Education - IDS-100)

    NDMU-100L First Year Seminar Lab

    NDMU-101 First Year Colloquium II

    NDMU-200 Transfer Student Colloquium

    Examines University culture, traditions and operations to address the interests and needs of transfer students. Particular attention is paid to mapping curricular and career plans to exploration of academic major requirements. [ 1 credit ]