NDMU Course Catalog : http://catalog.ndm.edu/ccg

School of Education Course Descriptions

BIO-560 BIOLOGY FOR TEACHERS (GRADES K-8)
This course presents an introduction to the structure and function of the fundamental unit of life, the cell.  Biology content includes metabolism, cell structure, patterns of inheritance, mechanism of gene actions, and evolution.  Mathematical content and skills are integrated throughout. [3 credits]

CHM-560 CHEMISTRY FOR TEACHERS (GRADES K-8)
This course presents an introduction to fundamental concepts and principles of chemistry.  Chemistry content includes chemical bonding, properties, and reactions; atomic and molecular structure; states of matter and solutions; basic thermodynamics and kinetics; acids and bases; descriptive and quantitative aspects of chemistry appropriate for educators in grades K-8.  Mathematical content incorporated includes: study of patterns, functional relationships/graphing, expressions, equations, inequalities, and variables. [3 credits]

EDGT-500 FOUNDATIONS OF GIFTED AND TALENTED EDUCATION
Provides an understanding of the historical foundations of gifted education in the United States and the key philosophies that shaped the various programs.  Students will become familiar with the cognitive characteristics of gifted children.  Students will examine important issues and trends in gifted education.  Students will compare quantitative and qualitative assessments that locations within Maryland use to define and identify those with gifts and talents and the ways that culture impacts identification. [3 credits]

EDGT-501 AFFECTIVE CHARACTERISTICS OF DIVERSE GIFTED AND TALENTED LEARNERS
Examines the social and emotional well being of gifted and talented students. The role of families, communities and environment and the ways in which they address the needs of those with gifts and talents is researched and discussed. The learning styles of individuals with gifts and talents are discussed. [3 credits]

EDGT-502 CURRICULUM FOR THE GIFTED AND TALENTED
Examines the ways in which curricula, including the Common Core State Standards, are planned and developed for gifted students. Attention is given to such issues as building a philosophical framework for curriculum, important design features for curriculum, scope and sequence, and unit development. [3 credits]

EDGT-503 RESEARCH SEMINAR IN GIFTED AND TALENTED EDUCATION
Affords students the opportunity to apply previous course learning to in-depth study and discussion of those with gifts and talents. Students will read current literature on a variety of issues surrounding the identification and education of the gifted and discuss their findings. Students will identify one area of gifted and talented education, such as autistic gifted, learning disabled gifted, or musical and artistic prodigies, design and conduct an action research project and share their work in their schools. This course affords students the opportunity to gain greater knowledge about the Maryland State gifted education competencies. [3 credits]

EDGT-504 PRACTICUM IN GIFTED AND TALENTED EDUCATION
Serves as the capstone course in the master's program. Students must draw on what they have learned in previous coursework as they work in area schools with gifted and talented individuals. Stu-dents will observe, assess, plan, and teach the gifted and talented, strengthening their skills. Students will assess their personal abilities and attitudes in order to work successfully with the learners. [3 credits]

EDGT-505 STRATEGIES FOR THE EDUCATION OF GIFTED AND TALENTED STUDENTS
Addresses appropriate strategies for best implementing curriculum, including the Common Core Standards, for the gifted and talented. Course participants consider critical thinking skills, research techniques, and problem solving skills. Additionally, the nature of creativity is examined as well as ways to foster creativity. Technology is stressed as an important tool for the gifted and talented. [3 credits]

EDON-501 INFANT AND CHILD MENTAL HEALTH
A self-paced or online course, designed to give you an understanding of the framework of and need for creating supportive learning environments for diverse learning populations. This course is designed to help educators achieve a better understanding of infant and toddler mental health, child development, and strategies that can be used to promote positive relationships with children and their families. This course provides information that will help the learner understand and identify his or her role as a child care provider, educator, and early childhood professional. Infant & Toddler Mental Health provides research-based information on child development, attachment, temperament, and curriculum. This course also lists resources for both teachers and parents who would like more help or information about infant and toddler mental health. [ 3 credits ] NOTE: This course includes a final case study paper in addition to the assignments in the syllabus.

EDON-502 EARLY CHILD: FAMILY-CENTER SERVICES
A self-paced or online course, designed to give you an understanding of the framework of and need for creating supportive environments for diverse learning populations. This course is designed to give you a new perspective on serving the needs of young children and their families. In this course you will learn what is meant by family-centered services as it applies to diverse systems of care, gain an understanding of family diversity, and explore the major stress factors facing families today. We will discuss the theoretical basis for family-centered services, as well as reflect on current research and best practice. Family-Centered Services will also examine the role of early childhood educators and explore ways to build partnerships with parents and create communities of care-for the benefit of our children, and ultimately society as a whole. [ 3 credits ] NOTE: This course includes a final case study paper in addition to the assignments in the syllabus.

EDON-503 EARLY CHILD: OBSERVATION AND ASSESSMENT
A self-paced or online course, designed to give you an understanding of the framework of and need for creating supportive learning environments for diverse learning populations. This course explores observation and assessment instruments, as well as recommended practices and available resources for infants, toddlers, and preschoolers. Content includes an emphasis on observing young children and assessing their early childhood learning environments. [ 3 credits ]

EDON-504 EARLY CHILD: PROGRAM PLANNING
A self-paced or online course, designed to give you an understanding of the framework of and need for creating supportive learning environments for diverse learning populations. This course is designed to give you a new perspective on planning and implementing developmentally appropriate programs for young children from birth through age eight. In this course you will learn what is meant by curriculum, assessment, evaluation, and program planning as these terms apply to early childhood education. We will discuss several historical perspectives and theories of child development, and examine best practice for early childhood education. We will also examine key concepts and specific activities for teaching various curricular content areas including language and literacy, mathematics and science, and the expressive arts. [ 3 credits ]

EDON-505 EARLY CHILD: TYPICAL AND ATYPICAL DEVELOPMENT
A self-paced or online course, designed to give you an understanding of the framework of and need for creating supportive learning environments for diverse learning populations. This course explores contemporary best practice and perspectives on early childhood development. Content includes patterns and sequences of typical development for children from birth to six years. Emphasis is on individual differences, cultural influences, and the impact of developmental delay and disability during infancy, toddlerhood, and the preschool years. Discussion will also include instructional technology (IT) and assistive technology (AT) applications for this population. [3credits ]

EDON-511 HARASSMENT, BULLYING & CYBER INTIMIDATION
Discusses definitions and the personal, social, and legal ramifications associated with sexual harassment, bullying, and cyber-intimidation. The course will address what we know about these troubling areas. We will then explore preventative strategies as well as how school staff can address these issues when they occur. A clear understanding of what constitutes harassment and the harmful effects of harassment on people and institutions is essential to providing a safe and inclusive school environment for all. [3 credits]

EDON-517 ADVANCED CLASSROOM MANAGEMENT
A self-paced or online course, designed to give you an understanding of the framework of and need for creating supportive learning environments for diverse learning populations. Geared primarily for professionals (e.g., regular or special educators, instructional assistants, school psychologists, counselors) serving children and youths presenting behavior problems in the school or community, this course focuses on cognitive and cognitive-behavioral interventions (often lumped together under the rubric "social skills") with an emphasis on teaching students how to change and manage their own behavior. Since previous knowledge and understanding of traditional behavioral (operant) concepts and strategies is required, it is strongly recommended that you take an introductory behavior management course to learn the basic terms and concepts of behavior management prior to taking this advanced course. [ 3 credits ] NOTE: This course includes a final case study paper in addition to the assignments in the syllabus.

EDON-525 TRAUMATIZED CHILD
Helps classroom teachers, school counselors, and other educational personnel gain strategies to reach and teach students who have been affected by stress, trauma, and/or violence. Participants will learn the signs and symptoms of stress and trauma and explore how stress, violence, and trauma affect a student's learning, cognitive brain development, and social-emotional development. The short and long term consequences of being exposed to stress, trauma, or violence, as well as the social and family causes, will be reviewed. The dynamics of domestic violence and community violence are also discussed as well as the educator's role in the intervention and prevention of violence. [3 credits]

EDON-526 VIOLENCE IN SCHOOLS
A self-paced online course designed to give you an understanding of the framework of and need for creating supportive learning environments for diverse learning populations. This course is designed to give participants an understanding of school violence and increase intervention strategies. The course provides an overview of violence and the motivational purposes behind aggression. The correlation and impact of the media, community, and family upon violence is investigated. The learner will gain an understanding of identification and intervention approaches to working with out-of-control behaviors. In addition, information about the national resources available for both parents and teachers is covered. Upon successful completion of this course, participants will have a better understanding of violence and the motivations behind its use, as well as specific strategies to minimize the occurrence of violence in the school and community. [ 3 credits ] NOTE: This course includes a final case study paper in addition to the assignments in the syllabus.

EDON-530 INTRODUCTION TO DIFFERENTIATED INSTRUCTION
A self-paced or online course, designed to give you an understanding of the framework of and need for creating supportive learning environments for diverse learning populations. This course is an interactive computer-based instruction course, designed to give you an understanding of the framework of and need for creating supportive learning environments for diverse learning populations. In this course you will learn what is meant by Differentiated Instruction (DI) and the common myths associated with creating the differentiated classroom. We will discuss the legal, theoretical, and pedagogical foundations in the field of education that support the utilization of differentiated instructional practices and principles. We will reflect on best practices and national trends in the design of the educational setting to meet the needs of a diverse learning population. Why DI?: An Introduction to Differentiated Instruction will also provide connections to a variety of concepts, variables, and resources that will assist practitioners in aligning their own professional practices with those found in the differentiated classroom. [ 3 credits ]

EDON-531 PLANNING/PREPARING FOR DIFFERENTIATED INSTRUCTION PROGRAM
In this course on Differentiated Instruction, the emphasis is on providing examples of strategies and methods associated with a DI approach. The course has been organized to ensure that each strategy, or idea on "how to" implement DI, is an extension of the DI approach as a whole and not just presented as a disjointed list of ideas to try. [3 credits]

EDON-532 UNDERSTANDING AND IMPLEMENTING COMMON CORE STANDARDS

A self-paced or online course, designed to give you a deeper understanding of the rationale for and structure of this particular standards-based framework.  The course provides an overview on the factors that contributed to the overall design of the Common Core Standards as well as practical pedagogical approaches that will support practitioners working toward deeper implementation.  We will reflect on the instructional shifts emphasized throughout the common Core Standards and contextualize the shifts based on the diverse population of students course participants serve. This course will also provide connections to a variety of instructional considerations that will support implementation regardless of educational context. Practitioners will be provided opportunities to reflect on current practices and the degree to which they align with the common Core Standards as well as with colleagues across a wide range of settings implementing these standards. [3 credits]

EDON-544 EDUCATIONAL ASSESSMENT
A self-paced or online course, designed to give you an understanding of the framework of and need for creating supportive learning environments for diverse learning populations. This course is designed to further develop the conceptual and technical skills required by teachers to help them identify their educational goals, and implement meaningful instructional strategies for effective learning by students with special needs. The focus of the course is on assessment for instructional programming and will outline procedures for designing or selecting, administering, and interpreting a variety of informal assessment measures typically used in schools. The presentation of assessment information in an acceptable format to parents and teachers is also addressed. [3 credits] NOTE: This course includes a final case study paper in addition to the assignments in the syllabus.

EDST-500 INTRODUCTION TO DESIGN, TECHNOLOGY, AND ENGINEERING: CONTENT AND INSTRUCTION STRATEGIES

This course will introduce teachers to the content base for Design, Technology, and Engineering (DTE) as educational content areas.  Through instruction and direct experience, participants will develop knowledge and skill related to: (1) design as a creative and innovative technological process; (2) technology as processes, knowledge and skills focused on meeting human needs; and (3) engineering as the focused application science, technology, and math knowledge and skills through systematic problem solving processes.  Learning activities will be based on the DTE problem solving process and will address a variety of learning styles through the construction of operating models, products, systems, and environments that demonstrate solutions to problems. [3 credits]

EDST-501 EXPLORATION IN DESIGN, TECHNOLOGY, AND ENGINEERING: CONTENT AND INSTRUCTION STRATEGIES
This course will continue teachers’ exploration of the content base for Design, Technology, and Engineering (DTE) as educational instructional areas.  Through instruction and direct experience, participants will practice the focused application of science, technology, math knowledge and skills through the construction of operating models, products, systems, and environments that demonstrate solutions to problems. [3 credits]

EDST-502 APPLICATION OF DESIGN, TECHNOLOGY, AND ENGINEERING: CONTENT AND INSTRUCTION STRATEGIES
This course will focus on teachers’ application of the content base for Design, Technology, and Engineering (DTE) as educational instructional areas.  Participants will apply the application of science, technology, and math knowledge and skills, through the construction of original operating models, products, systems, and environments that demonstrate solutions to problems. [3 credits]

EDST-503 PRACTICUM: STEM FOR TEACHERS K-8
The capstone experience of the program is a field-based practicum that integrates the course work and standards of practice of STEM education.  During the practicum students will be asked to put into practice a thoughtful and effective vision of STEM education.  Through direct supervision by program faculty and participation in a weekly seminar, students will work to pull together their program experiences and apply them to an authentic education context.  The practicum will provide students the opportunity to reflect on the direction of their professional career as a STEM educator through portfolio assessment. [3 credits]

EDST-504 STEM CURRICULUM DEVELOPMENT
his course presents teachers with the fundamentals to enact a STEM curriculum. The course focuses on using an integrated approach to implementing STEM standards of practice into pre-existing curriculum as well as designing new curriculum which incorporates Next Generation Science Standards, Common Core State Standards and Maryland STEM Standards of Practice.  This will be a highly interactive course where teachers will engage in numerous activities and discussions as they progress through an exemplar STEM unit. [3 credits]

EDU-508 ISSUES IN TESOL
Introduces students to the field of TESOL by providing an overview of instructional programs and approaches for teaching English as a second language to students from K-12 to postsecondary levels. Special emphasis is placed on the role of cultural differences on language development and academic achievement in United States classrooms. The course includes bilingualism, legal and political trends as they pertain to ESL students in various educational settings, and the impact of state and national initiatives, such as No Child Left Behind, on ESL students and TESOL. [3 credits]

EDU-509 PROCESSES AND ACQUISITION OF READING
Sets forth an interdisciplinary view of the foundations of reading and writing and the development and acquisition of literacy. The class addresses theories in such fields as linguistics, cognitive psychology and child development as they are seen in language and literacy development of the emerging elementary reader/writer. The course examines the history of various instructional methodologies and the research documenting their effectiveness, as well as understanding the impact on first and second language acquisition, typical development, gifted and talented, and other exceptionalities. The class reviews current approaches to all parts of the acquisition of literacy, such as direct instruction of phonics, whole language, language experience, literature-based curricula and the writing process. [3 credits]

EDU-510 ELEMENTARY READING MATERIALS
Exposes teachers to a variety of quality texts and other media, fiction and non-fiction for use in the elementary classroom, across the curriculum and the Common Core Standards. Criteria for selecting and evaluating materials and strategies for use in all areas of instruction, with attention to student and text diversity issues will be explored (e.g., socioeconomic levels, gifted and talented, ESOL, special needs, etc.) [3 credits]

EDU-511 ASSESSMENT OF READING
Provides students with a background in assessment and its relationship to instruction. Students will learn about the variety of assessments available to the classroom teacher in the areas of reading and writing. Students will learn how to administer, score and interpret the results of various assessments. Instructional decisions regarding the educational program of the child and his/her diverse needs will also be examined. [3 credits]

EDU-512 SCHOOL LIBRARY ADMINISTRATION
Presents the four roles of the school library media specialist as described in information power: instructional partner, teacher, information specialist and program administrator. The topics include organization, collection development, standards, leadership, curriculum, technology, program planning, facilities and management principles. [3 credits]

EDU-513 SCIENCE AND SOCIAL STUDIES IN THE ELEMENTARY SCHOOL
Emphasizes integration of content and process through demonstration, investigative and inquiry approaches. Addresses the three domains of knowledge, skills and attitudes. Attention is given to recent trends, national and state standards (including the Common Core State Standards), and the use of indicators in planning instruction and assessing to meet the diverse needs of students. Includes preparation of instructional units and microteaching experience. [3 credits]

EDU-514 ORGANIZATION OF INFORMATION
Examines the organization of information resources in a school library media center. Topics include retrieval tools, encoding standards (MARC, SGML) classification theory and principles of organization of information. [3 credits]

EDU-515 CURRICULUM AND METHODS IN EARLY CHILDHOOD EDUCATION
Surveys and critiques curriculum methods and materials for early childhood programs, preschool through primary grades. Instruction in assessment, planning and implementation of interdisciplinary activities to stimulate the cognitive, linguistic, social, and motor development needs of diverse learners. [3 credits]

EDU-519 HUMAN DEVELOPMENT AND LEARNING
Explores selected aspects of human development related to learning and instruction. Major psycho-logical concepts and learning theories will be examined and applied to the context of education. Emphasis will be placed on understanding cognitive and affective domains of development as well as behavior management, motivation, individual differences and exceptionalities in learning and instructional practices. Includes reflection, classroom activities, educational philosophy and class-room instruction. [3 credits]

EDU-520 CURRICULUM AND INSTRUCTION IN SECONDARY SCHOOLS
Examines aims, organization and administration of American secondary schools. Principles of curriculum organization and design for middle and senior high schools. Curriculum development in school systems, in specific schools, and in academic disciplines. Multicultural, socioeconomic and gender issues are considered. Class is interrelated with methods courses in study and application of principles of teaching-learning, uses of technology for instruction, analysis of teaching, assessment of classroom management. [3 credits]

EDU-523 EDUCATION IN AMERICAN SOCIETY
Traces the development of education in the United States. Includes study of significant social, cultural, political, intellectual and legal influences on American schools; the work of major shapers of American institutions; and contemporary issues and attitudes toward the enterprise of public education. [3 credits]

EDU-524 TOPICS IN EDUCATION
Examines selected issues in education. Topics change to reflect developments in the field. [3 credits]

Methods of Teaching in Secondary School

EDU-530 Art, PreK-12
EDU-531 English
EDU-532 World Languages
EDU-533 Mathematics
EDU-535 Music
EDU-537 Science
EDU-539 Social Studies

Examines objectives, nature and place of the academic disciplines in the secondary school, using (where applicable) the Common Core Standards). Readings include courses of study, current research in methodology and texts and material for teaching. Each course focuses on model and techniques for teaching each subject to diverse students (e.g., gifted and talented, special needs, ESOL, socio-economic levels, and other exceptionalities) at the secondary level. Includes long and short range planning, inclusion strategies interrelated with curriculum and resources in application of teaching, learning theory in such areas as direct instruction, cooperative learning, inquiry and discovery, motivation, questioning, discussion, classroom management and assessment of outcomes. Presentation and evaluation of demonstration lessons. Videotaping for analysis of teaching. [3 credits]

EDU-540 CHILD AND ADOLESCENT PSYCHOLOGY
Analyzes the five areas of development: physical, linguistic, cognitive, psychological and moral, for children from infancy through adolescence, through readings, lectures, class activities, and student projects. Students will learn about the history of child development theory and research, including classic debates such as nature versus nurture, stage versus continuous development and the balanced view. Major theorists and current research also will be reviewed as students learn key issues and concepts in each of the five areas as well as their influence and dependence on each other. Students will connect theories of development to their own class projects. [3 credits]

EDU-542 INSTRUCTION IN READING
Reviews current research findings related to integrated language arts instruction and their impact on classroom practices in schools. Numerous strategies and methods to develop and enhance the elementary student's reading, writing, listening and speaking skills are explored. A variety of management techniques will be discussed. [3 credits]

EDU-543 READING, ANALYZING AND INTERPRETING EDUCATIONAL RESEARCH
Provides an interactive learning environment that will enable students to acquire knowledge, skills and abilities required for the analysis, interpretation and evaluation of educational research. In addition, the course will enable students to cultivate the skills necessary for engaging in their own creative and meaningful research. [3 credits]

EDU-544 EDUCATIONAL ASSESSMENT
Focuses on student assessment and the relationship of assessment practices to instructional decision-making (especially with respect to diverse learners). Students will consider, analyze and apply a variety of approaches for interpreting individual and group behavior based on relevant research and best practices. Traditional assessment techniques, using standardized and criterion instruments, will be explored, as well as direct performance and portfolio assessments. Both classroom and clinical practice assessment strategies will be explored. [3 credits]

EDU-545 PRINCIPLES OF LINGUISTICS
Provides an introduction to the scientific study of language. The course presents an historical over-view of the major schools of thought in linguistics, followed by a discussion of current theory as it relates to the major subfields of linguistics, syntax, semantics, phonology and phonetics. This course serves as a prerequisite for all other linguistics courses in the TESOL program. [3 credits]

EDU-546 METHODS AND MATERIALS FOR TESOL
Aims to familiarize students with methods and materials available to the ESL teacher. Students analyze a wide variety of methods, with emphasis on currently accepted methodology. Different kinds of materials are examined in detail, including authentic materials. Students will also explore technological resources available to the ESL teacher, including the Internet. [3 credits]

EDU-547 ASSESSING SECOND LANGUAGE ACQUISITION
Introduces the student to various assessment techniques that are used in ESL teaching. Students ex-amine various traditional testing techniques, along with more recently developed alternative methods for assessing second language learning, focusing on the four language skills, reading, writing, listening and speaking, as well as communicative competence in general. In addition, students critically evaluate ESL assessment methods used for placement purposes by various (local) public school systems. [3 credits]

EDU-548 LANGUAGE LEARNING
Examines current theory in language acquisition from psycholinguistic and sociolinguistic perspectives. Although the basic principles of first language acquisition are analyzed to some extent, the main focus of the course is on theoretical principles as they relate to second language acquisition, including their application to second or foreign language teaching. Subtopics include sociocultural factors in language classrooms, individual language learning styles and strategies, and the impact of age and native language on (second/foreign) language learning. [3 credits]

EDU-551 TEACHING READING AND WRITING IN THE CONTENT AREAS PART II
Provides an advanced study of how to teach reading and writing to all students using motivating and accessible texts. Participants analyze literacy (the reading and writing process) to understand how levels of literacy are not absolute. Literacy is relative and depends on the diverse culture, language, background experiences, and skills of the reader (e.g., special needs, gifted and talented, ESOL, etc.) and the kind of text presented. Participants learn how to informally assess their students' levels of literacy and analyze texts for level of readability. Various reading and writing approaches and strategies in the content areas are modeled and demonstrated in class by the instructors and the participants. Participants learn how reading and writing are social acts of communication as they work together in this class discussing their own reading and writing. Participants compile a variety of texts (including materials for computer use) in the content areas in order to meet the needs of all of their students. [3 credits]

EDU-552 GLOBAL PERSPECTIVES IN TEACHING
Encourages an open inquiry into the nature of global education as a means to prepare students for intelligent participation in the contemporary world. Classroom materials and techniques are used to explore global issues, such as hunger, poverty, the environmental crisis, international development and world peace. Integrates content with pedagogy. [3 credits]

EDU-553 EDUCATION THAT IS MULTICULTURAL
Investigates the role of education in an increasingly pluralistic society and interdependent world. Students explore the nature of education which promotes recognition, understanding, and acceptance of individual uniqueness, inter-dependence, and cultural diversity within a pluralistic society. A variety of approaches to multicultural educational reform are addressed. Includes discussion of both theory and practice. [3 credits]

EDU-556 TECHNOLOGY FOR INSTRUCTION AND MANAGEMENT
Introduces learners to technology as a tool for classroom instruction and management. Students will be given opportunities in planning, designing and producing projects that meet the diverse instruction-al needs of students (e.g., special needs, gifted and talented, ESOL and other exceptionalities). The projects encompass skills in word processing, video, Web pages, multimedia and other technologies. Students examine online information services and the integration of technology into the curriculum and practice. [3 credits]

EDU-557 LEADERSHIP SEMINAR I
Involves student examination and critique of various models / theories of leadership while considering moral and ethical implications. Key elements of effective leadership are investigated and applied to school situations through reading, exercises, class discussions, case studies and group work. Students cultivate a reflective stance on their leadership abilities through self assessments. Students are encouraged to integrate and apply diverse leadership perspectives in order to enhance their abilities for educational leadership. [3 credits]

EDU-559 LEADERSHIP SEMINAR II
Considers the dynamics of innovation and change in organizations and institutions. Readings and discussions focus on the conceptualization, planning, and management of innovation and change. Seminar participants analyze the theoretical bases of various decision-making and problem-solving strategies and examine specific case studies relevant to change. Students are required to develop an analytical project in which they identify a particular problem and plan an effective strategy. [3 credits]
Prerequisite: 21 completed credits, including successful completion of EDU-557.

EDU-560 LEGAL ISSUES FOR TEACHERS AND ADMINISTRATORS
Surveys the fundamental legal principles and issues which affect public and private education. They will become acquainted with the American legal process and basic legal terminology. Using the case study approach to contemporary education law, students will become familiar with the diversity of legal issues that affect educators' professional lives. [3 credits]

EDU-563 CURRICULUM DEVELOPMENT
Considers the forces driving quality curriculum development. This course examines how different groups, issues, ideologies and research have influenced what and how children have been taught historically. Attention will be focused on recent reform literature directed at schools and its likely impact on curriculum. Current political, economic, demographic and academic trends will be studied. The process for curriculum design will be examined and applied as students develop a sample guide using the class as a workshop group. The course concludes with the development of a curriculum project designed to improve student learning by the application of research Informed theory and practice. [3 credits]

EDU-564 CONTEMPORARY EDUCATION ISSUES
Discusses current issues affecting schooling in the United States. Current national and state initiatives in education; the relationship between schools and the community; issues of public policy and the educational enterprise; social, political, economic, legal issues are included. Issues selected for discussion reflect contemporary concerns in education. [3 credits]

EDU-566 COMPARATIVE AND INTERNATIONAL EDUCATION
Identifies and explores the multiple interrelated crises facing education around the world. Participants evaluate the future of education in both industrial and developing countries and examine such critical issues as the worldwide growth of learning needs, inequities both within and among countries, and world-wide needs for education reform. [3 credits]

EDU-567 LEARNING THEORY AND PRACTICE
Evaluates theories of learning from cognitive, physiological and affective perspectives as a basis for effective instructional practice. Research into the theoretical basis for learning and higher level thinking skills is applied to educational planning, implementation, and evaluation. [3 credits]

EDU-569 SUPERVISION: EMPOWERING TEACHERS
Involves student examination and critique of the developmental supervisory approach. Key elements of effective supervision are investigated and applied to school situations through reading, exercises, class discussions, group work and videos. Knowledge of adult learning, interpersonal skills, and alternative supervisory practices according to varying developmental levels are emphasized. Strategies for empowering teachers and support staff are included in this course as a key requirement for supervisors in the educational arena. [3 credits]

EDU-575 INFORMATION LITERACY RESOURCES
Surveys resources in all formats needed to develop a collection that supports the information literacy program at the school level. [3 credits]

EDU-577 INTERNET IN TEACHING AND LEARNING
Explores the use of the Internet in the K-12 environment and how it impacts both student learning and teacher professional growth. The course will include an in-depth study of such topics as Web quests, research modules and telecollaborative projects. Students will create Web pages and learn about listservs. The course will also explore how some educators are using emerging technologies such as blogs and wakes in the classroom. Integrating resources into the school's curriculum with an emphasis on investigating how this will change teaching will be a major focus. [3 credits]

EDU-580 TEACHING READING AND WRITING IN THE CONTENT AREAS PART I
Presents the conceptual framework and methodology for teaching reading and writing at the secondary level. Emphasizes the holistic and developmental nature of reading/writing/learning processes. Explores literacy as a cultural, sociological phenomenon. Includes techniques for skill assessment and development in the oral and language areas of speaking and listening and in the written language areas of reading and writing. Emphasis is on language skill refinement across the curriculum as well as strategies for students with varying learning styles and needs (e.g., Gifted and Talented, ESOL, special needs, socio-economic, etc.) Explores the interactive nature of reading, the reading/writing connection and ways to integrate literature within the various disciplines across the curriculum. Discusses the teacher role in developing independent learning strategies and literacy for life. Includes preparation of lesson plans, activities and materials as well as strategies for organizing and managing literacy instruction in the content areas. [3 credits]

EDU-582 EMERGING LITERACY AND THE YOUNG CHILD
Explores emergent literacy as a cultural, sociological phenomenon. This course includes techniques for skill development in the areas of word recognition, phonetic and structural analysis, vocabulary development and comprehension using an integrated language arts model. Emphasis is on reading across the curriculum for the young child as well as strategies for students with varying learning styles and needs. Participants explore the reading/writing connection as well as literature- based instruction and discuss materials as well as strategies for organizing and managing a classroom reading program for the young child. [3 credits]

EDU-583 SPECIAL TOPICS IN MATHEMATICS EDUCATION
This course will examine effective instruction in the elementary and middle school mathematics classroom.  Instruction will focus on studying how students learn mathematics and the pedagogical knowledge specific to mathematics teaching and learning.  Candidates will analyze the mathematical thinking of students, integrate technology into mathematics instruction, and support a positive disposition toward mathematical processes and mathematical learning. The National Council for Teachers of Mathematics (NCTM) Standard, Maryland Common Core Curriculum including the Standards for Mathematical Practices, and the Partnership for Assessment of Readiness for College and Careers (PARCC) assessments will be addressed.  Problem solving approaches, authentic tasks, and active learning strategies will be included. This is a web-assisted course in which participants will use various websites for the completion of some assignments.  A continuation of Patterns and Algebraic Thinking for Elementary School Educators, extending the ideas considered there to functions defined by tables and graphs and to functions defined in either closed or recursive forms. [3 credits]

EDU-586 TECHNIQUES OF TEACHING READING AND WRITING TO STUDENTS WITH LIMITED ENGLISH PROFICIENCY
Addresses the development of reading and writing from a cognitive perspective. Students will become familiar with the approaches, methods and techniques appropriate for the teaching of reading and writing to students with limited English language proficiencies. Special topics such as the integrated skills curriculum, language-specific rhetorical styles and free voluntary reading will also be discussed. Students will evaluate and design appropriate classroom materials. [3 credits]

EDU-592 MATHEMATICS IN THE ELEMENTARY SCHOOL
Integrates mathematical concepts with the methods employed to teach mathematics in the elementary school. Emphasis is on National Council of Teachers of Mathematics (NCTM) standards and implementation of the Common Core Mathematics standards in instruction. Focuses on a hands-on approach using manipulatives. Includes preparation of lesson plans and microteaching experiences. Weekly observation and field experience in area schools. [3 credits]

EDU-595 TEACHING PRACTICUM
Provides an internship experience in TESOL education in a post-secondary setting in the United States or in an EFL program abroad. [3 credits]

EDU-596 ENGLISH GRAMMAR FOR ESL TEACHERS
Analyzes the grammar of American English in detail with an emphasis on areas of English grammar that tend to present problems for EFL students. Students learn how to teach grammar, including how to contextualize grammar instruction in thematic lessons. Included will be a discussion of how grammar instruction fits into current trends in language teaching. [3 credits]

EDU-601/611 INTERNSHIP: STUDENT TEACHING ACCORDING TO PROGRAM
Provides an internship in the appropriate subject and grade level in public schools for a period of 20 weeks, variably arranged according to program (MAT-or ACT.) Gradual immersion into teaching. Builds upon and extends activities of the clinical field experiences in observing and analyzing student behaviors; learning about the school; establishing professional relationships with students, parents, staff; observing and analyzing teaching. Interns begin by planning and teaching specific skills (for example, the inquiry method) with one or more classes, analyze progress with the guidance of the supervising teacher, and gradually assume responsibility for the entire teaching schedule. Interns are expected to demonstrate skill in meeting the needs of diverse learners (G&T, special needs, socioeconomic, ESOL and other exceptionalities) via long range and daily planning, uses of technology, use of teaching strategies identified in the Maryland Instructional Frameworks (critical thinking, problem solving, inductive thinking, questioning, reading and writing for meaning, constructing meaning). Supervision by master teacher and college supervisor. Student teaching portfolio. Extra fee required. [6 credits]
Prerequisite: Permission of department chair.
Note: Students preparing for dual certification enroll in designated alternative sections of appropriate internships for 3 credits each. Consult program advisor before registering.

EDU-601 INTERNSHIP: STUDENT TEACHING IN SECONDARY SCHOOL
EDU-602 INTERNSHIP: STUDENT TEACHING IN THE ELEMENTARY SCHOOL
EDU-603 INTERNSHIP: STUDENT TEACHING IN EARLY CHILDHOOD EDUCATION
EDU-605 INTERNSHIP: STUDENT TEACHING IN ART PreK-12
SPE-601 INTERNSHIP: STUDENT TEACHING IN SPECIAL EDUCATION
EDU-604 SERVICE LEARNING THROUGH ACTION RESEARCH

Enables MAT interns to engage in service learning as they develop and apply skills, knowledge and abilities in the construction and implementation of action research plans (often derived from student learning objectives) for the improvement of classroom teaching and learning. A structured series of learning activities will be assigned to develop skills in research methodology and data analysis. Students will be provided experience in the analysis and interpretation of their endeavors and the opportunity to gauge the extent to which the application of learned skills facilitates educational problem solving. Instruction integrated with activities of the appropriate internship. Concurrent enrollment in the internship expected; exception by permission of MAT coordinator only. [3 credits]

EDU-611 INTERNSHIP: STUDENT TEACHING IN TESOL
Provides a full-time internship in TESOL education in public schools. Gradual introduction into teaching. Builds upon and extends activities of the clinical field experiences in observing and analyzing student behaviors; learning about the school; establishing professional relationships with students, parents, staff; observing and analyzing teaching. Interns begin by planning and teaching specific skills (for example, the inquiry method) with one or more classes, analyze progress with the guidance of the supervising teacher, and gradually assume responsibility for the entire teaching schedule. Interns are expected to demonstrate skill in: long range and daily planning, uses of technology, use of teaching strategies identified in the Maryland Instructional Frameworks (critical thinking, problem solving, inductive thinking, questioning, reading and writing for meaning, constructing meaning), and in instructing and assessing English language development for students of other languages with limited English proficiency. Supervision by master teacher and college supervisor. [6 credits]

EDU-612 REMEDIAL READING INSTRUCTION FOR CLASSROOM AND CLINICAL SETTINGS
Researches, examines and implements a variety of remediation techniques in classroom and/or clinical settings. The course includes study of factors that influence reading success and that lead to an effective remediation program. Participants analyze individual student's strengths and needs in order to identify recommended remediation practices. [3 credits]

EDU-615 EDUCATOR AS A CHANGE LEADER
Explores the dynamics of innovation and change in organization and institutions, the conceptualization, planning, and management of innovation and change, and various decision-making and problem-solving strategies. [3 credits]

EDU-616 PRACTICUM: LEADERSHIP IN MATHEMATICS EDUCATION
This course will provide students experiences in mathematics leadership.  The candidate will work under the supervision of a building administrator and will function as a mathematics leader in the building. During class, candidates will define the role of a mathematics leader, learn about models of professional development and identify strategies for improving student achievement in mathematics. In the practicum, candidates will be responsible for planning, implementing professional development opportunities for faculty members and develop a program that will involve families in the mathematics education program. Candidates will learn about the Maryland Common Core State Curriculum, Standards for Mathematical Practices, and PARCC assessments (as they become available). This is a hybrid course in which participants will meet for five in-class sessions and participate in five online classes. [3 credits]

EDU-618 RESOURCE ROLE OF THE READING SPECIALIST
Evaluates roles and responsibilities of the reading specialist as an instructional leader in schools and school systems. The course addresses such curricular and instructional issues as research-based teaching strategies, grouping practices, and formal and informal assessments. Participants review and analyze these issues for their usefulness and appropriateness for implementation in schools and school systems. Participants also explore the human dimensions of the reading specialist's responsibilities with regard to the ARD process and relationships with parents/guardians, community groups, administrators, teachers and specialists within instructional structures and with experts in the field whose work may contribute to enhancing student reading skills. The course prepares the reading specialist to be a colleague and consultant to classroom teachers as well as a resource person for disseminating state, local and professional initiatives related to reading instruction. The reading specialist is also prepared to be a participant in program and staff development, an effective communicator of goals and programs for all constituencies, and an academic resource equipped to pioneer, foster, support, guide and assess the principles, methods and procedures that will improve reading instruction throughout a school and/or school system. [3 credits]

EDU-622 EDUCATION AND POLICY ANALYSIS FOR CHANGING SCHOOLS
Creates awareness of recurring issues and tensions inherent in providing educational opportunities in a democratic society. Examples are: impact of linguistic and cultural diversity on equity, ethical issues confronting teachers and policy-makers, tensions between individual and collective interests, limits of democratic authority and equality of educational opportunity in a democratic society. This course introduces the process by which such policies are accomplished: identifying context and relevant antecedents, framing of problems and solutions within policies, policy implementation and anticipating and responding to policy consequences. The course includes theoretical and applied readings on local, state and national policy issues as they affect the educational environment and the learning needs of diverse and changing student populations. [3 credits]

EDU-624 DIALECTS IN AMERICAN SCHOOLS
This advanced course examines the effects of linguistic variation in K-12 classrooms. Various factors will be analyzed that can result in linguistic variation, such as social class and ethnicity. Students examine nonstandard language varieties of English, including African American Vernacular English, and World English varieties. An important focus of the course will be effect of nonstandard English on the development of literacy skills. The course will also address unique pedagogical strategies for teaching speakers of nonstandard varieties of English. Students will complete individual research projects, in which they analyze the language development of K-12 students. [3 credits ]

EDU-629 THE ROLES OF THE LITERACY COACH
Assists reading specialist/ literacy coach candidates in examining the roles and responsibilities of the reading coach as learner, researcher, peer model, and supervisor of school-based literacy instruction. Participants examine the relationship of the reading coach to the reading specialist and the faculty/staff members of the learning community. Special emphasis will be placed on working with the adult learner to support teachers in understanding, implementing and evaluating grade level and subject area instruction. Assignments will involve in-class and field experiences that provide practice with coaching techniques. All areas of study will be linked to the standards for the literacy coach set forth by the International Reading Association. [3 credits]

EDU-631 URBAN EDUCATION
Advances the students' knowledge of the impact urban settings have had on education during the past 100 years. Emphasis will be placed on the influence of philosophical, sociological and cultural perspectives on schools as social and educational institutions. Students will be expected to define, analyze and explain the relationship between variances in learning styles and the social settings of learners. An understanding of the urban school throughout the past century will be developed and will enable students to determine how organizational practices and policies, societal demographics, teacher preparation, and learner characteristics affect urban education and urban public K-12 schools. Salient issues are: the definition of urban education, school funding, norms and folkways of urban teachers and learners, professional development for teachers and school staff, the roles of stakeholders and educators as change agents. [3 credits]

EDU-633 PHYSIOLOGICAL BASIS OF ATHLETICS
Acquaints graduate students with the physiological aspects of motor activity and the fundamentals necessary to the understanding and application of exercise physiology within the coaching arena. [3 credits]

EDU-634 ADVANCED SPORT SCIENCE AND COACHING
Studies the place of coaching in sport in contemporary society. The course provides a foundation for those who coach at any level. The art and science of coaching as presented in this course include the development of an individual philosophy of coaching and the application of fundamental/effective coaching and managerial practices. Participants will review the national standards for athletic coaches and relate the standards to various topics within the course. [3 credits]

EDU-635 SPORT AND FITNESS ANALYSIS
Focuses on general concepts that can be used by professionals who work with students in coaching, recreational or sports environments. Participants gain an understanding of the anatomy and mechanics of various structures of the body and then apply this knowledge to the analysis of a variety of coaching/recreational/sporting activities. [3 credits]

EDU-636 PSYCHOSOCIAL ASPECTS OF SPORT
Examines and evaluates various psychological and sociological principles as they relate to effective coaching. Discussions focus on psychological and sociological variables that can enhance or interfere with performance of the athlete(s). Participants will have the opportunity to bridge the gap between theory and real sporting situations. [3 credits]

EDU-637 MOTOR LEARNING
Investigates motor learning as an important component in human behavior as it relates to teaching, coaching, learning and performing motor skills. The course examines processes by which humans acquire and refine physical skills. Various theories addressing the learning and performance of motor skills are discussed. [3 credits]

EDU-647 LEARNING, LANGUAGE AND THE BRAIN
Demonstrates how new brain imaging capabilities illustrate the ways the brain acquires knowledge and stores memories. This seminar course examines current brain-inaction research and the insights this information provides for effective instructional practices with special attention to language acquisition and manipulation. Students design, conduct and discuss research projects addressing aspects of brain functioning and the consequences for learning. [3 credits]

EDU-660 LEGISLATIVE AND LEGAL DECISIONS AFFECTING CHANGING SCHOOL POPULATIONS
Applies analytical and legal reasoning skills to issues emerging from implementation of recent legislation setting standards for: achievement expectations for specific student populations, mandatory testing requirements, teacher quality and licensing, instruction for students for whom English is a second language and related issues. Using the case study approach, students apply the precedents established in previously studied landmark cases to cases and problems currently pending, or soon to come, before district courts and the Supreme Court. Emphasis is placed on alternative dispute resolution in a wide variety of situations that present the possibility of litigation with focus on issues affecting changing student populations. [3 credits]

EDU-665 DIGITAL GAME BASED LEARNING AND DESIGN
This course provides an overview of the learning theories, best practices, and classroom application models involved with incorporating educational games and simulations into learning environments. The use of current and emerging technologies found in the gaming arena will be explored and documented for classroom application. This course brings together cultural, business, government and technical perspectives on developing and integrating electronic gaming techniques and technologies to enrich learning. Course participants will develop an understanding of the current trends (technical and sociological) in computer and console gaming, and what can be learned and applied from the world of gaming to positively affect teaching and learning. They will also experience an authentic creative process when they explore the game design process. [3 credits]

EDU-672 CHANGING SCHOOL POPULATION IN HISTORICAL PERSPECTIVE
Considers the immigrant experience as integral to major developments in the history of American education. The United States has been called "a nation of immigrants," and John Dewey has defined the school as a society in miniature. This course traces the influence waves of immigration have had on American attitudes and institutions of education from colonial times to the present as successive generations have responded to the pedagogical, economic and political implications inherent in the changing demographics of American schools. The course provides insights into the aims, challenges and priorities for curriculum and instruction as American schools have confronted such issues as learning differences, gender, race, ethnicity and social structures in changing populations of learners. The course traces the history of complex interactions as multicultural and multilingual students, teachers, staff, parents, community leaders and others have sought to create schools as learning communities. [3 credits]

EDU-674 GLOBAL AND INTERNATIONAL PERSPECTIVES IN EDUCATION
Prepares students for learning and teaching for the 21st century with new methodologies, new skills and new approaches in an increasingly interdependent world. These interdependencies include: inter-national communications systems providing worldwide access to information, global economic situations that impact career and work, ideological contests that are global in nature and significance, and the challenge of global disparity in standards of living and access to resources. Inquiry into the nature of these interdependencies enables educators to make decisions impacting curriculum and instructional methodology appropriate for preparing all students for intelligent participation in the contemporary world. [3 credits]

EDU-675 DEMOCRACY AND EDUCATION: PHILOSOPHICAL PERSPECTIVES
Analyzes the major philosophical perspectives that have formed and continue to influence American attitudes toward the enterprise of schooling and toward the roles and responsibilities of schools in the United States. Selections address education both as a public responsibility and as an individual pursuit. Students also examine the unique moral, ethical and educational issues raised by the linguistically and culturally pluralistic nature of society in the United States. Through reading, study, analytic discussion and reflection students identify more clearly their own philosophies of education with Regard to serving non-mainstream learners and the ethical principles that guide their professional decisions. [3 credits]

EDU-676 EDUCATIONAL APPLICATIONS OF MULTIMEDIA
Provides an introduction to designing and planning multimedia projects in the K-12 setting through collaborative inquiry. Topics to be introduced include storyboarding, conferencing, video editing and incorporating multimedia elements into selected software programs. Students will read some of the latest research covering the impact of multimedia development on student achievement. [3 credits]

EDU-688 PRACTICUM: SCHOOL ADMINISTRATION AND SUPERVISION PART I
Begins the first phase of a year-long internship in school administration and supervision. This course blends leadership theory and practice and focuses on the ongoing professional growth and development of students by assisting them to improve leadership skills, techniques and behaviors that are related to effective school leadership. Students participate in an in-school practicum experience with their assigned administrators. Specific experiences will address various dimensions of effective school leadership (visionary leadership, instructional leadership, organizational leadership, community leadership, ethical leadership and political leadership). A seminar class complements the in-school practicum experience. Seminar readings and discussions focus on the conceptualization, planning, and management of innovation and change. Students are required to develop, in collaboration with their on-site mention-administrators, an analytic project in which they identify a particular problem and plan an effective strategy. Students are supervised, assessed and evaluated by a college supervisor and a school administrator. [3 credits]
Prerequisite: 27 completed credits, including successful completion of EDU-543 and EDU-557 or permission from the dean.

EDU-690 PRACTICUM IN SCHOOL ADMINISTRATION AND SUPERVISION PART II
Initiates the second phase of the year-long internship in school administration and supervision. This course is designed as a culminating experience for students preparing for Administration and Supervision Certification. The course blends leadership theory with practice and focuses on the ongoing professional growth and development of students by assisting them to improve leadership skills, techniques and behaviors which are related to effective school leadership. Students participate in an in-school practicum experience with their assigned administrators. Specific experiences are planned to enable the student to gain direct experience of the administrator's roles in the daily operation of a school. Specific experiences will address various dimensions of effective school leadership (visionary leadership, instructional leadership, organizational leadership, community leadership, ethical leadership and political leadership). This internship is taken following the successful completion of EDU-688 Practicum: School Administration and Supervision Part I. Students are supervised, assessed and evaluated by a college supervisor and a school administrator. [3 credits]
Prerequisites: EDU-688 with a minimum grade of B.

EDU-691 PRACTICUM: APPLICATION OF REMEDIATION IN A CLINICAL SETTING
Structures the culminating experience for students preparing for Reading Specialist Certification. The course requires students to integrate theory, research and application in an in-school practicum setting under the direction of the local school-based reading specialist and the College supervisor. Each intern works directly with three to six identified students. During this experience, interns apply and reflect upon various literacy assessment techniques. Interns plan and implement research based, effective and meaningful remedial plans based on students' strengths and weaknesses. [3 credits]
Prerequisites: Successful completion of EDU-511 and EDU-612 and permission.

EDU-697 LANGUAGE AND INTERCULTURAL COMMUNICATION FOR CHANGING POPULATIONS
Examines the nature of language as the instrument of communication that expresses cultural and societal modes of thinking, customs and values. Participants analyze their own and others' sociocultural perceptions, values and behaviors in order to gain insight into student behaviors and develop strategies that facilitate effective instruction and learning for all students. The study of linguistic patterns enables teachers and other educational leaders to gain global insights into the role of language in fostering individual and cultural identity. This course focuses on sociolinguistics and the social contexts in which language is used. [3 credits]

EDU-698 LINGUISTIC AND CULTURAL DIVERSITY
Assists educators in better understanding the nature of language and language acquisition in the context of their relevance for education. First and second language acquisition will be studied in detail, primarily from a cognitive perspective with emphasis on the analysis of the diverse variables that play a role in language acquisition and how these affect literacy development. The focus of this course will be on the study of language development of K-12 students who are linguistic minority students, including those for whom Standard English is a second dialect and those for whom it is a second language. [3 credits]

EDU-695 RESEARCH DESIGN
Examines and analyzes principles of research design in education. This will include a review of research tools and resources and an overview of quantitative and qualitative approaches as applied to educational issues. Students will be expected to identify elements of exemplary research models and to present a sample design in one of these modes. [3 credits]

EDU-701 METHODS OF QUANTITATIVE RESEARCH
Introduces the student to statistics and statistical reasoning, uses of location and dispersion measures, regression and correlation, formation of hypotheses tests and analyses of variance and contingency tables. Applies statistical concepts to research design and educational measures including description statistics, presentations of data, estimation and hypothesis testing. Practice entering, analyzing, and interpreting data using statistical software, such as SPSS, is integrated throughout the semester. [3 credits]

EDU-703 METHODS OF QUALITATIVE RESEARCH
Explores qualitative methods currently used in educational research. Students examine the paradigms drawn from philosophy, history, sociology, anthropology and comparative studies as they rely on narrative rather than quantitative ordering of data. [3 credits]

EDU-705 DISSERTATION SEMINAR
Supports each degree candidate in identifying a dissertation topic, conducting a comprehensive re-view of the literature relevant to the topic, and developing the dissertation proposal. The proposal presents the formal plan for research and includes an introduction, review of the literature and re-search methodology. In this collegial setting, seminar members present their findings, share research data and dilemmas, and participate in critically examining and analyzing their own and one another's progress. [3 credits]

EDU-706 DISSERTATION SEMINAR: METHODOLOGY
The overall goal of this course is to provide the student with the opportunity to extend skills learned in prior coursework in the dissertation program, and their prior experiential learning, leading to the development of a dissertation proposal. Student will extend prior coursework in theory, skills at developing literature reviews, and the appropriate use of research designs to develop a research design assessing the efficacy of an educational or educationally related project targeted to the student's substantive question of inquiry. Attention will be focused upon developing the skills and knowledge needed to formulate dissertation research questions in order to design a piece of research that is original, credible and important to the field. [3 credits]

EDU-801 DISSERTATION
Students are required to submit a dissertation that gives evidence of original, independent research and critical thinking on a topic in the field of instruction for changing populations. The dissertation demonstrates the candidate's proficiency in conducting original, in-depth research; subjecting this research to critical analyses; and presenting this research in a dissertation that makes a substantive contribution to the field. The dissertation is expected to be an intensive, deeply researched, sharply focused, original study that will add to the knowledge in the field rather than to the solution of a problem for a specific, practical application. The dissertation defense is presented before a committee of a minimum of five, including faculty from the Education Department as well as from academic disciplines relevant to the candidate's topic. [6 credits]
NOTE: Prior to undertaking the dissertation, candidates must pass oral and written comprehensive examinations demonstrating knowledge both of the broad conceptual and procedural aspects of instruction for changing populations and in-depth knowledge in the area of specialization in which the candidate proposes to undertake the investigations that will result in the doctoral dissertation.

EDUC-510  INTRODUCTION TO CULTURAL COMPETENCY AND EDUCATIONAL EQUITY
Candidates will acquire an understanding of the historical framework undergirding access to educational equity in American schools. Candidates will examine a myriad of qualitative and quantitative data points that challenge current belief systems about public schools. In addition, the course will examine the impact of the present public schooling structure (that is, Gifted and Talented Education, Special Education programs for ELLs, etc.) as it interfaces with Educational equity.

EDUC-511 CULTURALLY RELEVANT PEDAGOGY
This course focuses on the direct application of culturally responsive practices in and outside the classroom. Students will examine environmental factors, pedagogy, curriculum, and assessment practices to determine how each can provide opportunities for students growth and achievement in their classrooms and their communities.

EDUC-514 CRITICAL RACE AND THEORY IN EDUCATION
This course focuses on the development of Critical Race Theory as a theoretical framework to investigate how race and racism are organized and operative within the educational systems in the United States. Candidates will examine the foundational scholarship upon which the theory is based, and study the central tenants used as lenses to evaluate present practices in schools and school systems. This course will provide an historical overview of Cristal Race Theory and consider the following inter-related questions: How are racial, gender, social economic, disability, and orientation inequalities produced, reproduced and maintained in educational institutions and society? In what ways is Critical Race Theory used as an analytic tool to explain and address policy, reform, and practice.

ENV-560 SUSTAINABILITY FOR TEACHERS K-8 (TO BE DEVELOPED AS CAPSTONE COURSE)
This course will include studies of the interactions among the physical, chemical, biological, political and social forces which impact the environment.  Content will be delivered in ways K-8 educators will be able to implement in the classroom. [3 credits]

ENV-561 METHODS OF TEACHING ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCE
Through multi-disciplinary, hands-on lessons which are aligned with the Maryland Learning Standards K-12 for Science, Math, Language Arts and Social Studies, as well as the new Environmental Literacy Standards, teachers will gain content knowledge, learn about scientific practices of resource professionals, and learn about different methods to investigate Maryland related resource issues. Teachers will learn about student engagement in environmental education action projects and where to get funding in Maryland to do these projects with their students. [3 credits]

ENV-562 EXPLORING THE LOCAL ENVIRONMENT THROUGH FIELD STUDY
The purpose of this course is to provide teachers with the information, resources, and experience necessary to engage students in meaningful watershed experiences as defined by the Maryland Partnership for Children in Nature. Teachers will be prepared to plan and conduct environmental field studies that are aligned with local curricula, the Next Generation Science Standards and Maryland’s Environmental Literacy standards. Particular emphasis will be placed on the NGSS Science and Engineering Practices.  Field studies will include biological sampling and data collection at local natural areas. In addition, participants will be certified in the use of Project WET for use as a supplement to existing local curriculum.  Participants should be prepared for the physical demands of the course and to spend full days outdoors. [3 credits]

LSP-502 SPANISH FOR TEACHERS OF OTHER LANGUAGES
Surveys the components of oral language. The social, phonological, morphological, syntactic, semantic, and pragmatic aspects of Spanish as a language system are discussed. Students will be introduced to language variation, phonetic transcription, phonemes, morphemes, syntactic order, linguistic change, dialects of Spanish, and Spanish as a phenomenon in the United States. This course, designed specifically for teachers of other languages and taught entirely in Spanish, prepares students to take the Praxis exam for certification in Spanish. [3 credits]

LSP-526 HISPANIC WOMEN WRITERS
Focuses on major female Spanish-language authors throughout history. Incorporates scholarship by and about women. Explores women writers from both Spain and Latin America and their place in the literary canon. Studies a variety of literary genres and styles. [3 credits]

LSP-530 PERSPECTIVES ON SPANISH AS A WORLD LANGUAGE
Looks at Spanish as a world language that permits variation among its various dialects. Emphasizes linguistic and sociolinguistic phenomena throughout the history of Spanish that continue to be present. Students will gain an understanding of what underlies the difference among dialects of Spanish in today's world. [3 credits]

LSP-532 CONTEMPORARY SPAIN: LITERATURE AND THE ARTS
Explores literature, art, film, music and sculpture as a means of gaining an understanding of Spain today. Journeys through the past to discern the various cultural, religious and academic movements that have helped shape today's Spain. [3 credits]

LSP-559 CONTEMPORARY HISPANIC WORLD
Focuses on global issues and concerns from the perspectives of various Spanish-speaking populations in the world today. Through guided research and the use of authentic print and multimedia materials, students will explore notions of "Hispanic" culture and worldviews, as they analyze issues of global importance from multiple cultural perspectives. [3 credits]

LSP-560 ADVANCED ORAL COMMUNICATION IN SPANISH (PRAXIS PREP)
Focuses on oral and written language production, including a study of phonetics as a means of understanding non-native utterances. Students can expect to increase their technical vocabulary in Spanish, to understand the system of Spanish as a whole and to review advanced grammatical forms. Prepares students to take the Praxis exam for certification in Spanish. [3 credits]

MAT-501 NUMBER AND OPERATIONS FOR THE MIDDLE SCHOOL EDUCATOR
Integrates the study of the rational numbers with reflection on the teaching and learning of arithmetic concepts in the spirit of the NCTM's Principles and Standards of School Mathematics and the Common Core State Standards. Mathematical content includes rational numbers and their fundamental algorithms, the place of the rational numbers in the real number system, scientific notation as a means of expressing very large and very small numbers and number theory topics appropriate for the middle school. [3 credits]

MAT-503 FUNDAMENTALS OF ALGEBRA FOR THE MIDDLE SCHOOL EDUCATOR
Integrates the study of algebra and its applications to the world around us with reflection on the teaching and learning of algebraic concepts in the spirit of the NCTM's Principles and Standards of School Mathematics and the Common Core State Standards. Mathematical content focuses on basic algebraic concepts including signed numbers and their operations, problem solving, quantitative and qualitative graphs, proportional reasoning, linear functions, and functions defined by tables and graphs. Algebra is presented as the study of patterns, as a symbolic language, as a tool for problem solving, and as a way of modeling and understanding the physical world. Graphing calculators are used throughout the course. [3 credits]

MAT-507 ALGEBRAIC FUNCTIONS FOR THE MIDDLE SCHOOL EDUCATOR
Integrates the study of algebraic functions and their applications to the world around us with reflection on the teaching and learning of algebraic concepts in the spirit of the NCTM's Principles and Standards of School Mathematics and the Common Core State Standards. Mathematical content focuses on the function concept, function notation, function definition by equation, table and graph, rates of change, linear, quadratic and exponential functions and their applications. Graphing calculators are used throughout the course to explore functions and their properties numerically and graphically. [3 credits]
Prerequisite: MAT-503 Fundamentals of Algebra for the Middle School Educator.

MAT-508 ALGEBRA: AN ADVANCED PERSPECTIVE FOR HIGH SCHOOL EDUCATORS
Examines core high school mathematics content and problems from a mathematically advanced standpoint: looking at alternate definitions, language, and approaches and exploring connections be-tween topics usually studied separately. Topics selected from among real and complex numbers, functions, equations, integers and polynomials, modular arithmetic and number fields. Emphasis is placed on problem-solving both individually and collaboratively. [3 credits]
Prerequisites: One year of calculus and at least one proof or algebraic structure course such as Linear Algebra, Abstract Algebra or Real Analysis.

MAT-521 GEOMETRY AND MEASUREMENT FOR THE MIDDLE SCHOOL EDUCATOR
Integrates the study of geometric shapes, spatial reasoning, and measurement with reflection on the van Hiele framework and the NCTM's Principles and Standards of School Mathematics and the Common Core State Standards. Mathematical content includes two- and three-dimensional shapes and their properties e.g. congruence, similarity and symmetry, spatial reasoning and transformations, the measurement process and techniques. Interactive software will be used in the exploration of these topics. [3 credits]

MAT-522 GEOMETRY: AN ADVANCED PERSPECTIVE FOR HIGH SCHOOL EDUCATORS
Examines core high school mathematics content and problems from a mathematically advanced standpoint: looking at alternate definitions, language, and approaches, and exploring connections be-tween topics usually studied separately. Topics selected from among congruence, distance and similarity, trigonometry, area and volume, axiomatics, and Euclidean geometry. Emphasis is placed on problem solving both individually and collaboratively. [3 credits]
Prerequisites: One year of calculus and at least one proof or algebraic structure course such as Linear Algebra, Abstract Algebra, or Real Analysis.

MAT-531 DATA ANALYSIS AND STATISTICS FOR THE MIDDLE SCHOOL EDUCATOR
Integrates the study of data analysis and statistics with reflection on the teaching and learning of data analysis in the spirit of the NCTM's Principles and Standards of School Mathematics and the Common Core State Standards. Mathematical content includes experimental design and data collection, displaying data, exploring and interpreting data, measures of center and spread, ways to investigate the association between two variables and misuses of statistics. Graphing calculators and spreadsheet software are used throughout the course. [3 credits]

MAT-532 DISCRETE MATHEMATICS AND PROBABILITY FOR THE MIDDLE SCHOOL EDUCATOR
Integrates the study of discrete mathematics (sets, logic, counting) and probability with reflection on the teaching and learning of these concepts in the spirit of the NCTM's Principles and Standards of School Mathematics and the Common Core State Standards. Mathematical content includes sets and their operations, logical connectives and quantified statements, types of mathematical arguments and proofs, counting techniques, the probability of simple and compound events, sample spaces, probability distributions, and the use of simulations to generate data for determining probabilities and to test conjectures. Graphing calculators are used throughout the course. [3 credits]

MAT-533 CALCULUS FOR THE MIDDLE SCHOOL EDUCATOR
An integration of the study of calculus and its connections to the middle school curriculum with reflection on the teaching and learning of these concepts in the spirit of the NCTM's Principles and Standards of School Mathematics. Mathematics content includes sequences and series, functions, differentiation, integration and applications. Graphing calculators are used throughout the course. [3 credits]

MAT-541 NUMBER AND OPERATIONS FOR ELEMENTARY SCHOOL EDUCATORS
Integrates the study of the whole numbers and the integers with the approach to mathematics teaching and learning found in the National Council of Teachers of Mathematics' Principles and Standards of School Mathematics and the Maryland Common Core State Standards. Mathematical content includes place value, estimation, conceptual underpinnings of the conventional computational algorithms for whole numbers and extending these ideas to the integers. Early number concepts, how students develop number sense, how to judge when student-developed procedures are mathematically sound, common misconceptions and how to address these misconceptions are integral to this course. [3 credits]

MAT-542 NUMBER AND RELATIONSHIPS FOR ELEMENTARY SCHOOL EDUCATORS
Continues Number and Operations for Elementary School Educators, extending the ideas developed for whole numbers and integers to the rational numbers (represented as fractions and decimals) and the behavior of units under the four basic operations. Mathematical content also includes ratio and proportion as well as basic concepts of number theory. The mathematical content is integrated with the approach to mathematics teaching and learning found in the National Council of Teachers of Mathematics' Principles and Standards of School Mathematics and the Maryland Common Core State Standards. Common misconceptions related to this material and how to address these misconceptions are integral to the course. [3 credits]

MAT-543 GEOMETRY AND MEASUREMENT FOR ELEMENTARY SCHOOL EDUCATORS
Focuses on the development of visualization skills, familiarity with basic shapes, their properties, and the relationships between them (e.g., transformations, similarity and congruence), the communication of geometric ideas, the process of measurement, and working with length, area and volume. The mathematical content is integrated with the approach to the teaching and learning of these concepts found in the National Council of Teachers of Mathematics' Principles and Standards of School Mathematics and the Maryland Common Core State Standards. Reflection on the van Heile model for the development of geometric understanding is integral to the course as is the consideration of relevant common misconceptions and how to address them. [3 credits]

MAT-544 STATISTICS AND PROBABILITY FOR ELEMENTARY SCHOOL EDUCATORS
Integrates the study of probability and statistics with the approach to the teaching and learning of these concepts found in the National Council of Teachers of Mathematics' Principles and Standards of School Mathematics and the Maryland Common Core State Standards. Mathematical content includes designing data investigations, describing data in graphical and numerical formats, drawing conclusions, theoretical and empirical probability for simple events and two or more independent events, randomness and the difference between predicting individual events and predicting patterns of events. How students learn these concepts, associated misconceptions and how to address them are also considered in the course. [3 credits]

MAT-545 PATTERNS AND ALGEBRAIC THINKING FOR ELEMENTARY SCHOOL EDUCATORS
Includes the study of patterns, representing and justifying the resultant generalizations using algebraic notation and other representations, expressing functional relationships in symbolic and graphical format, proportional reasoning, solving linear equations and inequalities through the application of basic properties of the real numbers. The mathematical content is integrated with the approach to mathematics teaching and learning found in the National Council of Teachers of Mathematics' Principles and Standards of School Mathematics and the Maryland Common Core State Standards. Common misconceptions related to this material and how to address these misconceptions are integral to the course. [3 credits]

MAT-546 ALGEBRA FOR ELEMENTARY SCHOOL EDUCATORS
Continues Patterns and Algebraic Thinking for Elementary School Educators, extending the ideas considered there to functions defined by tables and graphs and to functions defined in either closed or recursive forms. Mathematical content also includes quantitative and qualitative graphs, proportional reasoning, linear and quadratic functions, the field properties of the real numbers, rates of change, and applications of algebraic concepts in problem solving. The mathematical content is integrated with the approach to mathematics teaching and learning found in the National Council of Teachers of Mathematics' Principles and Standards of School Mathematics and the Maryland Common Core State Standards. Common misconceptions related to this material and how to address these misconceptions are integral to the course. [3 credits]

PHY-560 PHYSICS FOR TEACHERS (GRADES K-8)
This course is an introduction to the fundamental laws of nature and their application to physical phenomena.  Physics content includes mechanics, acoustics, optics, electricity, and magnetism appropriate for educators in grades K-8.  It will also include an integration of the study of number relationships and computation in problem solving. [3 credits]

PHY-561 SPACE AND EARTH SCIENCE FOR TEACHERS (K-8)
This course is an introduction to the fundamental principles that underlie motion and structure of celestial bodies, including Earth.  Space and earth science content includes the motion and structure of celestial bodies, evolution of the universe, the structure of Earth, the processes that constantly reshape its surface, and plate tectonics.  Statistics and probability skills are integrated as appropriate. [3 credits]

SPE-511 DIAGNOSTIC AND PRESCRIPTIVE TEACHING OF READING AND WRITING
Provides students with a background in assessment and its relationship to instruction. Students will learn about the variety of assessments available to the classroom teacher in the areas of reading and writing. Students will learn how to administer, score and interpret the results of various assessments. Instructional decisions regarding the educational program of the child will also be examined. [3 credits]

SPE-512 DIAGNOSTIC AND PRESCRIPTIVE TEACHING OF READING AND WRITING PART II
Advances students' experience with assessment and its relationship to instruction, particularly in the areas of reading and writing. Students will learn about a variety of informal assessments available to the classroom teacher in the areas of reading and writing and will learn how to administer, score and interpret the results of these assessments. Students will consider why it is important to know and apply brain research to the teaching of reading and writing. Reporting assessment results to parents and developing appropriate educational programs will also be examined. [3 credits]

SPE-518 BEHAVIOR IS LANGUAGE (ONLINE)
Gives the learner a new perspective on student behavior and effective tools to facilitate positive student change. It provides a developmental framework to help the learner understand what students are trying to communicate through the "language" of their behavior. Topics covered include behavioral techniques and intervention strategies that remediate disruptive behaviors, reduce power struggles while increasing classroom control, reduce educator workload, and help prevent burnout. After successfully completing this course, the educator and his/her students will be better equipped to find and implement creative, effective solutions to behavioral problems. [3 credits]

SPE-524 TOPICS IN SPECIAL EDUCATION
Considers selected issues in special education. Topics change reflecting developments in the field. [3 credits]

SPE-526 SPECIAL EDUCATION FOR THE CLASSROOM TEACHER
Addresses the rights of special needs students, legal foundations, the attitudes and needs of parents and the responsibilities of educators. Explores characteristics of exceptionalities. Designed for the classroom teacher, this course stresses strategies for inclusion and adaptations for the regular class-room including the use of Common Core standards. Includes discussions with professionals. [3 credits]

SPE-527 INCLUSION: WORKING WITH SPECIAL NEEDS STUDENTS IN GENERAL EDUCATION CLASSROOMS
Surveys the history and legal foundations of current special education programs and practices. Geared to the experienced general education practitioner, the course explores a wide range of management and learning strategies to help meet the needs of exceptional and at-risk populations in the general education setting. Fulfills MSDE special education course requirement. [3 credits]

SPE-530 ATTENTION DEFICIT DISORDER (ONLINE)
A self-paced or online course, designed to give you an understanding of the framework of and need for creating supportive learning environments for diverse learning populations. This course will help the learner achieve a better understanding of ADD and intervention strategies to facilitate positive student change. This course covers the history of the disorder, accepted methods to assess and identify students with the disorder, and various methods, medications, and strategies that are currently used to treat it. For situations in which services beyond what can be provided in the classroom are required, the referral process for getting help for the student will be addressed. Reference materials include a list of resources for both teachers and parents who would like more help or information about ADD or ADHD. [3 credits ] NOTE: This course includes a final case study paper in addition to the assignments in the syllabus. [3 credits]

SPE-531 AUTISM & ASPERGER’S DISORDER (ONLINE)
A self-paced or online course, designed to give you an understanding of the framework of and need for creating supportive learning environments for diverse learning populations. This course describes Autism and Asperger's Disorder, including characteristics of these disorders, associated learning styles, communication weaknesses, and various intervention strategies. The course helps the learner make sense out of why individuals with Autism spectrum disorders behave the way they do, and what you can do to enhance more appropriate behavior. This course also lists resources for educators, related service personnel, and parents who want more help or information on Autism and Asperger's Disorder. [3 credits] NOTE: This course includes a final case study paper in addition to the assignments in the syllabus.

SPE-532 CHILD ABUSE (ONLINE)
A self-paced or online course designed to give you an understanding of the framework of and need for creating supportive learning environments for diverse learning populations. Designed to help the learner identify and effectively teach students affected by child abuse and/or neglect, this course covers how to recognize the signs of physical, emotional, and sexual abuse, and physical and emotional neglect in students. It also discusses the specific factors that exist in families who abuse or neglect their children. A major emphasis in this course is to help the participant understand the special learning needs of abused or neglected children and how to meet those needs in the regular classroom. Working with parents and community agencies is also emphasized. NOTE: This course includes a final case study paper in addition to the assignments in the syllabus. [3 credits]

SPE-533 UNDERSTANDING AGGRESSION (ONLINE)
A self-paced or online course, designed to give you an understanding of the framework or a need for creating supportive learning environments for diverse learning populations. This course includes topics on violence, aggression in the classroom, youth gangs, aggression in sports and on television, how drugs and alcohol play a role in aggression and violence, and "hot spots" that tend to breed aggression and violence. It is designed to help school personnel become more aware of the causes of aggression and ways to evaluate it and intervene before it turns to violence in the schools. The course also discusses aggression in our communities through driving, dating, sports, television, and music, and how these issues are dealt with in modern society. [3 credits]

SPE-543 ASSESSMENT OF SPECIAL NEEDS POPULATIONS (SECONDARY)
Introduces the diagnostic processes used in special education for students from birth to adulthood. Includes informal and formal assessment methods as well as analysis, interpretation and presentation of test results. Course content covers federally mandated assessment regulations. The course includes prescriptive techniques and instructional planning for special needs students at the secondary level. [3 credits]

SPE-544 ASSESSMENT OF SPECIAL NEEDS POPULATIONS (ELEMENTARY)
Introduces the diagnostic processes used in special education. Includes student conducted informal and formal assessments as well as analysis, interpretation and presentation of test results. Covers prescriptive techniques and instructional planning. Note: Students with prior experience in special needs testing should enroll in SPE-545. [3 credits]

SPE-545 ASSESSMENT OF SPECIAL NEEDS POPULATIONS II
Addresses current issues and trends in assessment, and explores formal, informal, and innovative means of assessing student needs and achievement. Issues related to testing exemptions and accommodations will also be addressed. Designed for students with experience in special education. [3 credits]
Prerequisite: Prior experience in special needs testing.

SPE-546 METHODS OF TEACHING STUDENTS WITH SPECIAL NEEDS
Provides the student with methods to facilitate the teaching of students with significant learning and behavioral differences. The course content addresses cognitive processing, classroom management and behavioral support strategies. Models of instructional delivery, adaptation of instructional materials, strategy instruction and means of assessing students' progress are explored. Current trends, issues, and legislation updates are included as well. [3 credits]

SPE-556 ASSISTIVE TECHNOLOGY: TECHNIQUES/STRATEGIES FOR ACCESSING CURRICULUM
Focuses on the role of assistive and instructional technology in accessing the general education curriculum (e.g., Common Core Standards) for students with and without disabilities within the Universal Design for Learning framework. Participants will develop a basic understanding of the principles of universal design and how these principles can be applied to curriculum materials making them more accessible for all students. Familiarity with resources as well as the integration of strategies and tools enabling students to access curriculum will also be incorporated into the course. Online course. [3 credits]

SPE-570 INDIVIDUALIZING THE CURRICULUM: STRATEGIES FOR HOLISTIC INTERVENTION
Explores a broad spectrum of classroom and behavior management strategies as well as generic and subject specific study, organizational and self-regulatory skills. Course will focus on research support as well as systematic, effective implementation. (Expansion of the strategies component of SPE-527 Teaching Special Needs Students in Inclusive Settings, a course offered in the Post-Baccalaureate Certificate Program). [3 credits]

SPE-571 VOCATIONAL SKILLS IN SPECIAL EDUCATION METHODS
Develops the knowledge and skills to assist individuals with disabilities in transitioning from school to postsecondary life. Transition planning will be defined and related disability legislation explored. The family's role in transition will be discussed as well as empowering student self-determination and involvement. Person-centered practices to individualize the transition process will be explored. Community transition planning will be emphasized, including interagency agreement. Teaching for transition, finding vocational placements for students, pursuing postsecondary educational opportunities and independent living supports will be examined. Students will learn to design and implement individual transition plans for youth with mild to significant disabilities. [3 credits]

SPE-576 COMMUNICATION SKILLS FOR THE SCHOOL-BASED PROFESSIONAL
Addresses issues related to effective, collaborative team coordination in various programs providing services to school age children. "Teaming" for academic and social/emotional concerns, effective preventive interventions, resolving conflict, utilization of school and community resources, and effective communication with parents or primary caretakers, and support or monitoring agencies will be included. [3 credits]

SPE-578/579 TEACHING MATH TO STUDENTS WITH SPECIAL NEEDS ELEMENTARY/SECONDARY
Provides pre-service and in-service teachers with appropriate methods to facilitate the teaching of mathematics to students with special needs and to gifted students. The course content includes teaching for understanding, development of mathematical thinking, performance-based instruction, and curriculum thrusts defined by NCTM (National Council of Teachers of Mathematics) standards. Models of instructional delivery, adaptations of curriculum and materials, problem solving strategies, and assessment options are explored. Current issues and trends concerning quality mathematics programs are discussed. [3 credits]

SPE-580 SEMINAR IN THE EDUCATION OF STUDENTS WITH LOW INCIDENCE DISABILITIES
Provides opportunities to learn from presentations by professionals who serve students with low incidence disabilities. Issues related to disabilities such as traumatic brain injury, sensory impairments, severe/profound mental retardation and medically fragile children will be addressed by professionals who work with these children on a daily basis in various school and community settings. [3 credits]

SPE-601 INTERNSHIP: STUDENT TEACHING IN SPECIAL EDUCATION
Prerequisite: Permission of the dean of education. [3 credits]

SPE-631 AUTISM SPECTRUM DISORDER
Helps participants understand the symptoms of ASD (Autism Spectrum Disorder) in students, how it affects their ability to learn through assessment and observation methodologies and implementation strategies in the classroom to help students, educators, and parents cope with the disability. Participants will learn inclusive educational settings techniques and the importance of trans-disciplinary teaming for students with ASD. Finally, participants will review and consider variables in the environment impacting on behavior management no matter where the students fall on the spectrum. Online course. [3 credits]

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