Interdisciplinary Studies (IDS)

Interdisciplinary Studies (IDS) is a rigorous and unique Program offering students the versatility to design academic plans through the process of integrative learning. Working closely with their advisors, students develop Integrative Learning Plans comprised of two- or three-disciplines that integrate multicultural and multidisciplinary perspectives. To meet NDMU students’ diverse social, cultural, and educational needs, IDS offers both on-campus and online credit-earning opportunities.

Courses

IDS-105 Dimensions of College Skills, Learning and Achievement

Provides students with assessments of skills in writing, reading and mathematics which then are integrated into customized coaching for each student. The class stresses communication and integrated into customized coaching for each student. The class stresses communication and quantitative problem solving readiness for academic success in first-year entry-level studies. Connections between career aspirations and choice of acdemic major will be explored with the guidance of faculty, academic success coaches and career development professionals. [ 3 credits ]

IDS-150 Introduction to Women's Studies

Helps students examine the differing meanings of feminism based on readings and films from a variety of disciplinary perspectives. Examines how race, ethnicity, class, age, ability and sexual orientation shape women's points of commonality and difference. Includes a service-learning project involving incarcerated women. Fulfills general education requirement in gender studies. [3 credits]

IDS-160 Introduction to Peace Studies

This is an introduction to peace and justice studies. The course focuses on negative peace (i.e., eliminating direct violence, including war) as well as positive peace building (fostering an equitable economic system and ecological balance). The course analyzes the roots of violence and inequity as well antidotes to these problems. Fulfills general education requirement in cross-cultural studies and history. [3 credits]

IDS-172 Honors: The Axial Age: Philosophy of East and West

Considers the new ways of thought that emerged in the ancient Near East, Greece, India and China during the first millennium B.C. ("the axial age"). Thinkers reconsidered basic areas of concern-the transcendent, human nature, the family, society, government, knowledge, the past and death-in relation to the pre-existing culture. For example, this re-interpretation of tradition led to the rise of Biblical Judaism in the Near East; classical philosophy in Greece; the Upanishads and Buddhism in India; and Confucianism and Daoism in China. In this seminar, students discuss the thought of the "axial age," compare ideas across civilizations and learn how to write philosophical essays. Prerequisite: Morrissy scholar or permission. Fulfills general education requirement in 200 level philosophy. [3 credits]

IDS-200 Foundations of Leadership for Women

Presents an interdisciplinary approach to developing leadership skills in a world of social change. Students will examine multiple leadership paradigms with a focus on models that are inclusive, empowering, purposeful, ethical and process-oriented. They will critically examine their own perceptions about leadership; identify relevant leadership attitudes, behaviors and skills; and apply leadership knowledge through a variety of experiences including self-assessment, skill development, service-learning and small group team activities. Prerequisite: IDS 100L. [3 credits]

IDS-226 Why Care? Justice and Service

Provides students with an opportunity to study the University's mission of social responsibility through readings and discussion. Students will also develop a hands-on understanding of what it means to be a socially-responsible citizen through a service-learning experience. [3 credits]

IDS-230 Career Decision Making Seminar

A readings and discussion course which will focus on career development theories and applications. Students will learn strategies to help them choose a major and/or career, identify interests, skills and values, develop effective job-hunting and career advancement strategies. Career assessment and resume construction are included.

IDS-231 Honors: The Science of Science Fiction

Considers science fiction as a literature of ideas-the ideas of modern science. Selects contemporary science fiction writers and film makers in order to gain a perspective on the development of a fiction of scientific ideas and a prophecy of future technological change. Employs reading, film and the campus planetarium. Prerequisite: Morrissy scholar or permission. [3 credits]

IDS-271 Honors: Romanticism: The Beautiful Infinite

Analyzes seminal works of the 19th century Romantic movement in the fields of art and music. The relatedness of the two forms is revealed through discovery of common themes running through works of the Romantic period-the emancipation of the individual, the love of nature, nationalism, and fondness for the fantastic and the exotic. Common qualities of expression found among the two art forms during the period also emerge, providing a holistic sense of the intellectual and artistic atmosphere of the times. Opportunities for visits to museums, concerts, and theatre or opera performances are provided. Prerequisite: Morrissy scholar or permission. Fulfills general education requirement in fine arts. [3 credits]

IDS-273 Honors: Living in the New Millenium

Explores life in the new millennium: what has been, what is now and what is to come. Examines questions of political and social movements, population growth, cultural diversity, emergent economics, technological change, biological engineering and space exploration in the first 50 years of the 21st century. Prerequisite: Morrissy scholar or permission. [ 3 credits ]

IDS-300 Found of Leadership for Women

The course presents an interdisciplinary approach to developing leadership skills in a world of social change. Students will examine multiple leadership paradigms with a focus on models that are inclusive, empowering, purposeful, ethical, and process-oriented. They will critically examine their own perceptions about leadership, identify relevant leadership attitutdes, behaviors, and skills, and apply leadership knowledge through skill development, service learning, and small group team activities. Women's College students must have completed the Emerging Leaders program and transfer, CE, and WEC students should have completed BUS 302 Principles of Management. 3 credits.

IDS-310 Service Abroad: Women in Leadership and Service

Service abroad is an independent, self-sustaining course which enhances all departments and programs. It is another opportunity for Notre Dame women to further expand their knowledge of the world and their self-giving. Service Abroad immerses the participant more deeply into the culture of another country. Prerequisite: Completion of required independent study/lab with a grade of B and Junior/Senior standing. Fulfills general education requirement in cross-cultural studies. [3 credits]

IDS-310L Service Abroad Lab: Women in Leadership and Service

This independent study, prior to the actual service, introduces the student to the history, culture and language of the country where she will give service. The exact content of the course is determined by the instructor and depends on the student's knowledge and level of preparation. Prerequisite: Permission of program director. Fulfills general education requirement in cross-cultural studies. [1 credit]

IDS-325 Hrs: Educating Women: Amer Exp

This course examines the educational experience of women in the United States in the 19th and 20th centuries. Students survey ideas, attitudes and arguments about the education of women; explore the history of academies and women's colleges, coeducation in public and private schools and colleges, and the uniquely American expansion of educational and professional opportunities for women. Includes the work of pioneers and contemporary leaders. Prerequisite: Morrissy Scholar or permission. 3 credits.

IDS-340 Introduction to Catholic Studies

Provides an overview of various dimensions of the Roman Catholic faith, including Catholic practices, histories, cultures and doctrines. Topics to be considered are: Catholic spirituality and institutions, Catholic ecumenism and inter-religious dialogue, Catholicism and the arts, sciences and social action; the history of the Catholic Church, global Catholicism, contemporary Catholic theology, and the future of the Catholic Church. Prerequisite: RST-201. Fulfills general education requirement for 300/400-level religious studies.

IDS-361 Career Internship

Combines the experiential component of an on-site professional work placement with an interdisciplinary consideration of work-related issues. Focus of the course is on integrating the academic component with work experience through reflection, class discussion and assignments. Prerequisites: Completed 30 credits, attended an Academic Career and Enrichment Center internship orientation workshop, minimum sophomore status, and academic advisor's permission. [2, 3 or 4 credits]

IDS-369 Honors: Genethics

Provides students with the opportunity to understand and evaluate various religious and philosophical positions and arguments on a range of contemporary moral issues related to biotechnology. Explores the science of genetics and its application to the fields of biology, technology and medicine. Examines selected topics in the ethics of genetic testing, research, drugs and therapy. Prerequisite: Morrissy scholar or permission; RST-201. Fulfills general education requirements for 300/400 level religious studies and values. [3 credits]

IDS-371 Hrs: Power of Ideas

IDS-373 Honors: Cosmos and Creation: Religion and Science

Explores the relationship between religion and science as bodies of knowledge, modes of inquiry, and ways of knowing. Examines the complex history of science and religion as social institutions in various degrees of cooperation and tension. Areas of inquiry will include theology, spirituality, scientific theories, and philosophy of science, as well as the intersection of these areas at key historical moments such as the Copernican revolution, natural selection, and the development of quantum physics. Prerequisite: RST 201. Fulfills general education requirement for 300/400 level religious studies. [3 credits]

IDS-376 Hrs: Family Bonds

IDS-377 Hrs: Heritage Civ & Jew

IDS-378 Honors: The Holocaust

Explores the roots of anti-Semitism and the rise to power of the Nazis. Considers the development of the German policies toward the Jews, from economic discrimination to planned extermination, the fate of Jews in various countries under German control, and the possibility of resistance and opportunities for rescue. Prerequisite: Morrissy scholar or permission. [3 credits]

IDS-380  Research Apprentice

Introduces an academically-based didactic experience in which the student is trained in the methods of research at the college level for a specific discipline. The student serves as a research apprentice to a faculty mentor within the student's academic discipline. There is an interdisciplinary monthly seminar for all apprentices, an experiential student research component, weekly office hours and weekly supervision with the faculty mentor. Permission of instructor and research mentor. [1, 2, or 3 credits: 10 semester hours for 1 credit; 20 semester hours for 2 credits; or 30 semester hours for 3 credits]

IDS-410 Seminar: Leadership and Social Change

Helps students integrate previous academic and experiential learning to address a contemporary social issue, and develop workable and innovative solutions to tackle some aspect of that social issue. With coordinator approval, students may take the seminar portion of the course along with a relevant senior-level practicum in their major. [3 credits]

IDS-411 Topics: Green Baltimore

Through an intensive seminar and discussion format, this course will consider the "green movement" and sustainability initiatives with particular attention to the Greater Baltimore area. Topics will include green business practices, sustainability and the environmental climate in Maryland, green science, the debate on global warming and related questions, and the role of modern communications media in the public debate on these matters. [ 3 credits ]

IDS-430 Science and Health Policy: Critical Issues

Provides opportunities for students to attend a Washington, D.C. seminar to learn first-hand from women scientists, leading health experts, medical researchers, and pharmaceutical representatives who are shaping our nation's agenda in this critical policy arena. Speakers are drawn from a variety of agencies and organizations including the National Science Foundation, National Institutes of Health, and the National Research Council. Field trips to some government agencies. Students need to register in two placed to attend the seminar and receive college credit. Students must register for the Winterim course at NDMU (IDS-430) and they must also complete a registration from www.plen.org. [3 credits]

IDS-440 Senior Seminar in Women's Studies

Explores issues concerning women through research and research methodologies that use and apply multidisciplinary feminist theory. This is the culminating capstone seminar for the community of women's studies scholars. Prerequisites: IDS-150, two women's studies electives or permission of instructor. [3 credits]

IDS-450 Seminar Experience: Peace and Justice

Provides students with a focused seminar experience that allows them to consider the coursework for the minor through the acquired lens of peace and justice studies. Prerequisite: IDS-160. [3 credits]

IDS-455 Seminar in Catholic Studies

Serves as the capstone for the Catholic Studies minor. As such, it provides students with a focused seminar experience that encourages substantial guided research on a topic in Catholic Studies mutually agreed upon by student and professor. May include a service learning component. Prerequisite: IDS-340. [3 credits]

IDS-461 Professional Internship

Combines an on-site professional work placement with opportunities to reflect on the work experience as it relates to the student's overall academic program. The focus of the course is on development of effective job search and networking skills and strategies, career management and advancement, and professional growth and development. Prerequisites: completion of 30 credits, attendance at an Academic Career and Enrichment Center internship orientation workshop, sophomore status, academic advisor permission, completion of IDS-361 or department practicum. [2, 3 or 4 credits]

IDS-462 Advanced Professional Internship

Offers a departmentally-monitored, off-campus professional work experience for upper-level students who have completed IDS-461 and do not have a required departmental practicum. Students work with their academic advisor or a designated faculty member to identify objectives for the experience and complete related assignments. Prerequisites: completion of 30 credits, meetings with an Academic Career and Enrichment Center counselor and with one's academic advisor or designated faculty member, sophomore status, academic advisor permission and completion of IDS-461 or department practicum. [2, 3 or 4 credits]

IDS-471 Honors: Politics and Ethics of War and Peace

Explores war and peace through an examination of historical conflicts, social science explanations, ethical positions and alternative peace proposals. Considers 20th century conflicts and alternative explanations of war, and the individual, state and international levels. Compares and contrasts ethical positions from several religious and philosophical traditions. Prerequisite: Morrissy scholar or permission and RST-201. Fulfills general education requirements in 300/400 religious studies, values, and history. [3 credits]

IDS-479 Honors: Philosophy Through Literature

Takes a fresh look at traditional philosophical problems using classic philosophical texts and literary works that deal with common issues. Considers the questions: What is self? Is there an answer to the problem of evil? Are our actions free or determined? Are there any objective moral values? Is the material world real? Prerequisite: Morrissy scholar or permission. Fulfills general education requirement in 300/400 level philosophy. [3 credits]

IDS-480 Advanced Research Apprentice

Expands the academically based didactic experience of IDS-380 in which the student is trained in the methods of research at the college level while serving as a research apprentice to a faculty member within the student's academic discipline. In this second course, the apprentice deepends and broadens skills and techniques related to research project and to demonstrate more independence in executing research. This course provides a unique opportunity for students to train for post-baccalaureate research teaching assistantships through skill development. Prerequisite: IDS-380. [1, 2, or 3 credits: 10 semester hours for 1 credit; 20 semester hours for 2 credits; 30 semester hours for 3 credits]

IDS-496 Teaching Apprentice

Introduces an academically-based didactic experience in which the student is trained in the philosophy and methods of teaching at the college level for a specific discipline. The student serves as an educational apprentice to a faculty mentor within the student's academic discipline. There is an interdisciplinary monthly seminar for all apprentices, an experiential student teaching component, weekly office hours and weekly supervision with the faculty mentor. Permission of instructor. [3 credits]

IDS-498 Advanced Teaching Apprentice

Expands the academically based didactic experience of IDS-496 in which the student is trained in the philosophy and methods of teaching at the college level while serving as an educational apprentice to a faculty member within the student's academic discipline. In this second course, the apprentice develops skills and techniques to assess student work in the content area. This course provides a unique opportunity for students to train for post-baccalaureate teaching or graduate teaching assistantships through skill development. Prerequisite: IDS-496. [3 credits]

NDMU-100 Perspectives on Education and Culture

Assists first-year students in making a successful transition to college life. The course has three overlapping themes: becoming an intentional learner, becoming a Notre Dame woman, and acquiring global and intercultural fluency. Each student will examine and reflect upon various aspects of her life, including her relationship to other students, the institution and the community (understanding culture, appreciating diversity). Students will have the opportunity to develop personal, academic, and leadership skills and habits that will enhance their college experiences and promote lifelong learning. Required for first-year traditional age students and transfer students with fewer than 12 credits. [3 credits] 

NDMU-100L Experiential Laboratory: Perspectives on Education and Culture

Assists first-year students in making a successful transition to college life. The course focuses on developing skills to support adjustment to college, developing life skills, and developing skills for personal success. Required for first-year traditional age students and transfer students with fewer than 12 credits. NDMU-100, Perspectives on Education and Culture is a required co-requisite for this course. A passing grade in both NDMU-100 and NDMU-100L is required in order to successfully complete this course and to be awarded credit. [1 credit]