Pharmacy Studies/Pre-Pharmacy

Biology or Chemistry Department

Jim Culhane, Ph.D.
Jennifer Kerr, Ph.D.

Degrees offered

Major

Campuses

Main Campus

Pharmacists are health care professionals who provide complementary expertise to medical care practitioners. With the growing need for more healthcare professionals as the population ages, and with continuing sophistication of medications, pharmacists have become important members of the healthcare team. Students in the Women's College are offered several pre-pharmacy options that provide preparation for entrance into a Doctor of Pharmacy (Pharm.D.) program.

Women's College

Overview
Pre-Pharmacy Program
Earning a B.A. in Preparation for a Pharm.D. Degree
Accelerated 3+4 Year B.A.-Pharm.D. Program
B.A. in Biology Coursework
B.A. in Chemistry Coursework
Program Entrance, Standing, Admission to the School of Pharmacy, and Granting of the B.A. Degree

Preparing for a Career in Pharmacy

Students in the Women's College are offered several pre-pharmacy options that provide preparation for entrance into a Doctor of Pharmacy (Pharm.D.) program. Pharmacists are health care professionals who provide complementary expertise to medical care practitioners. Their knowledge and skills are utilized in a wide range of practice settings, including but not limited to community pharmacies, health care organizations, the pharmaceutical industry, pharmacy education, managed care, and governmental agencies. With the growing need for more healthcare professionals as the population ages, and with continuing sophistication of medications, pharmacists have become important members of the healthcare team.

The Doctor of Pharmacy degree, conferred by schools of pharmacy, is the entry point into a career in pharmacy. To prepare for admission to pharmacy school, students take a core curriculum including courses in the sciences, mathematics, social sciences, and humanities.

The pre-pharmacy program coordinators will assist Women's College students in identifying the appropriate course curriculum that will prepare them for entrance into a Pharm.D. program, including the School of Pharmacy at Notre Dame. There are a number of avenues to this end, including successfully completing the necessary undergraduate prerequisites, then applying to a school of pharmacy, or completing an appropriately configured undergraduate degree, followed by application to a school of pharmacy. (The undergraduate degree is typically earned in a science-related field.) An accelerated B.A Pharm.D. track (3 + 4 undergraduate/professional curriculum) is available to qualified Women's College students through the School of Arts and Sciences and the School of Pharmacy.

Back to top

Pre-Pharmacy Program

In the pre-pharmacy program option, a student follows a curriculum (approximately 74 credits) to complete specific courses in biology, chemistry, mathematics, physics and liberal arts. Students should indicate their intent to participate in the pre-pharmacy program by noting this on their application for admission and subsequently on the declaration of major form. Each student should contact her advisor or the pre-pharmacy program coordinator in order to plan her program of study and learn about program requirements; this must be done prior to registration.

During the program, students take the Pharmacy College Admission Test (PCAT) and apply for admission to a particular pharmacy school. They follow all application guidelines presented by the school of pharmacy regarding application procedures, deadlines, recommendation letters and interviews. Each school of pharmacy determines its own admission standards. Students are responsible for determining the unique prerequisite courses that are required by the school of pharmacy to which they will apply.

The pre-pharmacy course of study for students at Notre Dame is shown below. It must be noted that study in summer and Winterim may be needed to complete the program in a timely manner. All students who are interested in the program should consult their advisors and the pre-pharmacy program coordinator for specific advice and course approval. Representatives from Notre Dame's School of Pharmacy are also available to students for consultation.

Courses in the Pre-pharmacy Curriculum

Notre Dame of Maryland University reserves the right to revise the curriculum at any time when deemed necessary and to apply such revisions to registered and accepted students and to new admissions.

Requirement of 74 credits are as follows:

ENG-101 College Writing (3) 
English Literature Course (3) 
COM-106 or 206 Oral Communication/Public Speaking (3)
PHL-330 or 339 Ethics/Medical Ethics (3)
ECO-211 or 212 Micro- or Macroeconomics (3) 
MAT-211 or 212 Calculus I or II* (4) 
MAT-215 Basic Statistics (3)
CHM-110,111 General Chemistry (8) 
CHM-210, 211 Organic Chemistry (8) 
BIO-111 Fundamentals of Biology (4) 
BIO-201, 202 Human Anatomy and Physiology I, II  (8) 
BIO-340 Microbiology (4) 
BIO-239 Genetics (4) 
PHY-101 or 102 General Physics I or II* (4) 
Social Sciences (6) 
IDS-100 First-Year Seminar (3)

Plus three elective credits (3) from religious studies, fine arts, humanities, languages, business or interdisciplinary studies, excluding science, mathematics, physical education or health care courses. See Below.

* MAT-212 and PHY-102 are required to complete the chemistry major

#Students who did not receive transfer credits at the time of admission and all students matriculating in the Women’s College in fall 2009 and thereafter cannot use credits for anatomy & physiology received from community colleges to satisfy the NDMU School of Pharmacy pre-requisite requirement. Additionally, such students are required to take 8 credits of anatomy and physiology at Notre Dame of Maryland University should they wish to apply to the NDMU School of Pharmacy.

Note: Transfer students intending to apply to Notre Dame School of Pharmacy should check with the Notre Dame School of Pharmacy office of admissions to determine if science courses taken at community colleges will meet prerequisite requirements.

Recommended Elective Courses in the Pre-pharmacy Curriculum

COM-221 Small Group Communication (3)
IDS-100L Emerging Leaders Lab (1)
LSP-210 Spanish for Health Professions (3)
PHL-302 Philosophy of Human Nature (3)
PHL -330 or 339 Ethics or Medical Ethics (3)
PHL-334 Business Ethics (3)
POL-102 Introduction to American Politics (3)
POL-217 Civic Participation and Leadership (3)
POL-401 Political & Economic Globalization (3)
POL-440 Global Issues (3)
PSY-167 Human Relations in a Culturally Diverse Society (3)
PSY-205 Theories of Personality (3)
PSY-233 Human Growth & Development (3)
RST-306 Christian Bioethics (3)
RST-311 World Religions (3)
RST-331 Comparative Religious Ethics (3)
RST-450 Judaism, Christianity and Islam (3)
RST-452 Buddhism and Christianity (3)
RST-347 Introduction to Spirituality (3)
RST-409 Death & Dying (3)

Back to top

Earning a BA in Preparation for a Pharm.D. Degree

Students may decide to complete a degree in chemistry or biology and then apply to pharmacy school to pursue a Pharm.D. degree (appropriate pharmacy admission prerequisites are taken). This option allows the student to present a strong application and provides a second degree. Many applicants to Pharm.D. programs hold an undergraduate degree—students may improve their prospects for admission by using this option and it provides additional career paths. To complete an undergraduate degree in chemistry or biology, students should take the following courses in the first semester: BIO-111, CHM-110, ENG-101, IDS-100, MAT-211. See the chemistry and biology department sections for other information and options.

Back to top

The Accelerated 3+4 Year BA-Pharm.D. Program

Program Description

The departments of biology and chemistry, together with the School of Pharmacy, provide an accelerated 3 + 4 year undergraduate - professional school education leading to the B.A. in biology or chemistry and the Doctor of Pharmacy (Pharm.D.) degrees. This program consists of three years of coursework in the Women's College (approximately 104 credits for biology majors or 114 credits for chemistry majors), followed by a four-year professional curriculum of pharmacy (147 credits) in the School of Pharmacy.

Undergraduate Requirements for the BA in Biology or Chemistry-Doctor of Pharmacy Degree Program

Students who enter this program upon admission to Notre Dame must be matriculated biology or chemistry majors in the School of Arts and Sciences. Students must complete the following courses with a minimum grade of 'C' for each course, an overall GPA of at least 3.0 and a science GPA of at least 3.0. Additional requirements are outlined below.

Back to top

BA in Biology Coursework

Fall Spring 
First year      
CHM-110 4 CHM-111 4
BIO-111 4 BIO-239 Genetics 4
MAT-211 Calculus 4 RST-201 3
IDS-100 3 LSP-101 3
COM-106 3 ENG-101 3
[18 credits]   [17 credits]  
Second year      
CHM-210 4 CHM-211 4
BIO-201 Human Anatomy & Physiology 4 BIO-202 Human Anatomy & Physiology 4
PHY-101 4 PHY-102 4
LSP-102 3 LSP-103 3
PHL-201 3 ECO-211/212 3
[18 credits]   [18 credits]  
Third year      
BIO-340 Microbiology 4 BIO-300/400* 4
RST-Upper Level 3 MAT-215 Statistics 3
English Literature 3 PHL-330 or PHL-339 3
PED (not transferable to SOP) 1 Fine Arts 3
PSY/POL or SOC 3 PSY/POL or SOC 3
History 3  
[17 credits]    [16 credits]  

*In the third year, students must take one additional upper division (300/400) biology course in either the fall or spring semester.

Back to top

BA in Chemistry Coursework

Fall Spring 
First year      
CHM-110 4 CHM-111 4
BIO-111 4 BIO-239 Genetics 4
MAT-211 Calculus 4 MAT-212 4
IDS-100 3 LSP-101 3
COM-106 3 ENG-101 3
[18 credits]   [18 credits]  
Second year      
CHM-210 4 CHM-211 4
BIO-201 Human Anatomy & Physiology 4 BIO-202 Human Anatomy & Physiology 4
PHY-101 4 PHY-102 4
LSP-102 3 LSP-103 3
PHL-201 3 ECO-211/212 3
[18 credits]   [18 credits]  
Third year      
BIO-340 Microbiology 4 MAT-215 Statistics 3
English Literature 3 PHL-330 or 339 3
PED (not transferable to SOP) 1 History 3
PSY/POL or SOC 3 PSY/POL or SOC 3
CHM-350 Chemical Literature 1 CHM-450 Chemistry Seminar 1
CHM-301 or 303 4 CHM-302 or CHM-305 4
[16 credits]   [17 credits]  
Summer 
First year  
Fine Arts 3
Second year  
RST-201 3
Third year  
RST Upper Level 3

Students may need to complete coursework during the summer to fulfill program requirements.

Back to top

Program Entrance, Standing, Admission to the School of Pharmacy, and Granting of the BA Degree

Applying to the BA-Pharm.D. program is a two step process—one application is filed for admission to the University and a supplemental application for acceptance into the accelerated program. 

A student is eligible for application to the BA-Pharm.D. program if she:

  1. Is an incoming first year student or a first year NDMU student in their fall semester (no transfer students accepted).
  2. Scored a minimum of 550 each on the Critical Reading and Mathematics portions of the SAT, or earned a minimum ACT score of 24
  3. Submits a copy of high school transcripts, NDMU midterm grades (if applicable), and essay to the B.A.-Pharm.D. program committee

Prospective Women's College students should apply to the program via the Notre Dame undergraduate admission procedure. They can indicate their interest in the program on their application and present the required application materials. Qualified students are admitted to the program prior to their first year of study or during the fall semester of their 1st year.

While in the program, each student must maintain an overall GPA of 3.0 and a science GPA of 3.0 while meeting course grade requirements. The pre-pharmacy program coordinator oversees student progress with the assistance of the pre-pharmacy program committee. If a student’s grades fall below minimum standards for the program, the student will be placed on probation for a period of one semester and will be removed from the program if she does not return to the specified GPA requirements. Students dismissed from the program will be allowed to continue in the in the traditional pre-pharmacy studies undergraduate program at Notre Dame (provided the student meets the academic standards.)

Admission requirements to the School of Pharmacy are set and administered by the School of Pharmacy. Each student enrolled in the B.A.-Pharm.D. program will complete the application for admission to the School of Pharmacy, and will be granted a guaranteed seat if the following criteria are met and process followed:  

  1. Complete an application to the School of Pharmacy through the Pharmacy College Application Service (PharmCAS) by the deadline indicated in the SOP admissions information.
  2. Earn a minimum overall GPA of 3.0 and a science GPA of 3.0 (on a 4.0 scale).
  3. Complete a School of Pharmacy Supplemental application, which is sent to all qualified applicants.  (the fee for the supplemental application will be waived for Notre Dame of Maryland University undergraduate applicants in the B.A.-Pharm.D. program). 
  4. Take the Pharmacy College Admission Test (PCAT) either in the summer prior to or the fall semester of the 3rd year, and earn a competitive composite score of 50 or above. 
  5. Complete an interview with a favorable outcome and fulfillment of other specified requirements.

Students entering the School of Pharmacy will be subject to all policies and procedures of the program outlined in the School of Pharmacy Handbook and Catalog.  Students in the B.A.-Pharm.D. program who have successfully completed 37 credits in the School of Pharmacy first-year professional curriculum will be granted their Bachelor of Arts in biology or chemistry upon completion of the following courses:

First-Year School of Pharmacy Course of Study

Fall Spring 
PHRD-300: Foundations for Pharmacy Practice  2 PHRD-306: Pharmacist Care Lab II 2
PHRD-301: Pharmaceutical Calculations 2bc PHRD-308: Developing the Leader Within 2
PHRD-302: Pharmacy & the U.S. Health Care System 3 PHRD-309: Immunology 3bc
PHRD-303: Pharmaceutics I & Lab 4bc PHRD-310: Care of Diverse Populations 3
PHRD-304: Pharmacist Care Lab I 2 PHRD-311: Pharmaceutics II & Lab 4bc
PHRD-305: Biochemistry 4bc PHRD-312: Pharmacy Practice Management 3
PHRD-307: Applied Biomedical Sciences Workshop 3bc [17 credits]  
[20 credits]      

bCourses credited towards a B.A. in Biology
cCourses credited towards a B.A. in Chemistry

Applying to Pharmacy School 

All applicants must submit an application both through the Pharmacy College Application Service (PharmCAS.org) and via a School of Pharmacy Supplemental Application The Pharmacy College Admissions Test (PCAT) is taken early in the second year of the pre-pharmacy program (if the student is pursuing a traditional undergraduate degree, the PCAT may be taken at a later time). Students are responsible for learning about the Pharm.D. program of study and admission requirements of the schools to which they will apply. A committee letter or individual letters of recommendation are needed as well as an interview. Experiential learning in pharmacy-related activities is an important part of the path to pharmacy school.

The School of Pharmacy at Notre Dame will guarantee interviews to up to 15 students each year from the Women's College traditional pre-pharmacy program.

To be considered for Notre Dame School of Pharmacy admission, the student must:

  • Maintain a 3.0 cumulative GPA and a minimum 3.3 GPA in pre-pharmacy courses with all pre-pharmacy/science courses carrying a grade of C or higher
  • Earn a composite score on the Pharmacy College Admissions Test (PCAT) at the 50th percentile or higher
  • Successfully complete an admissions interview.

The pre-pharmacy program coordinators and the School of Pharmacy director of admissions can describe this opportunity.

Back to top


Courses

BIO-111 Fundamentals of Biology

Focuses on the structure and function of the fundamental unit of life, the cell. Examines basic biological molecules, membrane structure and function, basic metabolism, photosynthesis, cellular reproduction, evolution, genetics and introductory systematics. In weekly laboratory exercises, students design and conduct experiments to answer scenario-based questions. Includes independent small-group laboratory research project that culminates in a student research symposium. Three hours lecture and four hours laboratory. Designed for students with a strong high school background in biology, chemistry and mathematics. Prerequisite: MSAT greater than department-designated value or BIO-110 with minimum grade of C+, or permission of chair. Fulfills general education requirement in natural sciences. [4 credits]

BIO-201 Human Anatomy and Physiology I

Integrates the study of structure with function of the human body. As a suite of courses, BIO-201 and 202 are intended for students interested in satisfying requirements for pharmacy and various allied health programs. The content and level of delivery of both BIO-201 and 202 are structured so that they are compatible with similar courses offered by cooperating institutions. BIO-201 includes discussion of cellular, tissue, integumentary, skeletal, muscular and neural systems. Includes laboratory study of anatomical models of humans and skeletal components, and dissection of a cat. BIO-202 includes discussion of endocrine, circulatory, immunological, digestive, urinary and reproductive systems. Strongly emphasizes study of physiological functions that includes monitoring of body systems with analog and digital hardware. Each course includes three hours lecture and three hours laboratory. A competency exam covering basic chemistry and biology may be administered at the first class meeting and weighed in the final grade. To begin the course sequence, the student must complete BIO-111 or the equivalent with a minimum grade of C or obtain permission of the instructor. BIO-201 with minimum grade of C is a prerequisite for BIO-202. [ 4 credits each term ]

BIO-202 Human Anatomies and Physiology II

Integrates the study of structure with function of the human body. As a suite of courses, BIO-201 and 202 are intended for students interested in satisfying requirements for pharmacy and various allied health programs. The content and level of delivery of both BIO-201 and 202 are structured so that they are compatible with similar courses offered by cooperating institutions. BIO-201 includes discussion of cellular, tissue, integumentary, skeletal, muscular and neural systems. Includes laboratory study of anatomical models of humans and skeletal components, and dissection of a cat. BIO-202 includes discussion of endocrine, circulatory, immunological, digestive, urinary and reproductive systems. Strongly emphasizes study of physiological functions that includes monitoring of body systems with analog and digital hardware. Each course includes three hours lecture and three hours laboratory. A competency exam covering basic chemistry and biology may be administered at the first class meeting and weighed in the final grade. To begin the course sequence, the student must complete BIO-111 or the equivalent with a minimum grade of C or obtain permission of the instructor. BIO-201 with minimum grade of C is a prerequisite for BIO-202. [ 4 credits each term ]

BIO-239 Genetics

Considers the mechanisms by which biological information is stored, accessed, and passed on from one generation to the next from both Mendelian and molecular genetic perspectives. Introduces basic techniques of molecular biology such as bacterial transformations, gel electrophoresis, DNA sequencing and sequencing analysis. Includes the use of online databases such as Pub Med and sequence analysis tools such as BLAST. Three hours lecture and three hours laboratory. Prerequisites: BIO-111 and CHM-110, each with a minimum grade of C or permission of instructor. [ 4 credits ] Honors section meets concurrently with and considers the same subject matter as BIO-239 (non-Honors). Honors students meet for an extra hour per week to concentrate on the historical and social aspects of genetics. Four hours lecture and three hours laboratory.

BIO-340 Microbiology

Examines the world of microorganisms and their occurrence and roles in nature. Focuses on the study of structure, growth, pathogenicity and genetics of microbes as well as their interactions in microbiome and biofilm communities. An independently designed and executed, small-group research project is completed in the laboratory and culminates in a student research symposium. Three hours lecture and four hours laboratory. Prerequisite: BIO-239 and CHM-111, each with a minimum grade of C or permission of the instructor. [ 4 credits ]

CHM-110 General Chemistry I

Focuses on fundamental chemical concepts and principles with emphasis on inorganic compounds. Guided inquiry methods are used to explore descriptive and quantitative aspects of chemistry, including atomic and molecular structure, chemical bonding, states of matter, solutions, basic thermodynamics, electrochemistry, equilibrium, acids and bases, and kinetics. Laboratory is coordinated with lecture and emphasizes basic techniques such as titration, spectroscopy, and quantitative and qualitative analysis, along with inorganic synthesis and calculator-based experiments. Three lectures, one discussion period and one laboratory each week. High school algebra strongly recommended. Satisfies the general education requirement in natural science. [4 credits]

CHM-111 General Chemistry II

Focuses on fundamental chemical concepts and principles with emphasis on inorganic compounds. Guided inquiry methods are used to explore descriptive and quantitative aspects of chemistry, including atomic and molecular structure, chemical bonding, states of matter, solutions, basic thermodynamics, electrochemistry, equilibrium, acids and bases, and kinetics. Laboratory is coordinated with lecture and emphasizes basic techniques such as titration, spectroscopy, and quantitative and qualitative analysis, along with inorganic synthesis and calculator-based experiments. Three lectures, one discussion period and one laboratory each week. High school algebra strongly recommended. Prerequisites: CHM-110 with a minimum grade of C or permission of chair. Permission of the instructor is required to enroll in CHM-111 if the prerequisite CHM-110 was not fulfilled at Notre Dame. [ 4 credits ]

CHM-210 Organic Chemistry I

Focuses on functional group classification, nomenclature, synthesis, reactions, and spectroscopic analysis with a strong emphasis on reaction mechanisms of organic compounds. Laboratory is coordinated with lecture material and stresses basic techniques such as distillation, recrystallization, extraction, and chromatography, along with organic synthesis using both macroscale and microscale applications. Laboratory also includes an introduction to organic structure determination using a variety of spectral methods, including nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy, infrared spectroscopy and mass spectrometry. Three lectures, one discussion and one laboratory period per week. Prerequisites: CHM-110, 111. [4 credits]

CHM-211 Organic Chemistry II

Focuses on functional group classification, nomenclature, synthesis, reactions, and spectroscopic analysis with a strong emphasis on reaction mechanisms of organic compounds. Laboratory is coordinated with lecture material and stresses basic techniques such as distillation, recrystallization, extraction, and chromatography, along with organic synthesis using both macroscale and microscale applications. Laboratory also includes an introduction to organic structure determination using a variety of spectral methods, including nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy, infrared spectroscopy and mass spectrometry. Three lectures, one discussion and one laboratory period per week. Prerequisites for: CHM-210 with a minimum grade of C or permission of chair. Permission of the instructor is required to enroll in CHM-211 if the prerequisite CHM-210 was not fulfilled at Notre Dame. [4 credits]

CHM-301 Physical Chemistry I

Provides a detailed view and in-depth analysis of the following topics: physicochemical properties of matter in the gaseous, liquid, and solid states; kinetics and thermodynamics of chemical reactions; behavior of solutions; phase equilibria; electrochemistry; introductory-level quantum mechanics; computational chemistry; atomic and molecular structure; and spectroscopy. The relationship between microscopic structure and macroscopic behavior of matter is explored in laboratory activities and characterized in mathematical terms. Three lectures, one four-hour laboratory each week. Prerequisites: CHM-211, MAT-211 and 212 with minimum grade of C. Permission of instructor if prerequisites are not satisfied. [4 credits]

CHM-302 Physical Chemistry II

Provides a detailed view and in-depth analysis of the following topics: physicochemical properties of matter in the gaseous, liquid, and solid states; kinetics and thermodynamics of chemical reactions; behavior of solutions; phase equilibria; electrochemistry; introductory-level quantum mechanics; computational chemistry; atomic and molecular structure; and spectroscopy. The relationship between microscopic structure and macroscopic behavior of matter is explored in laboratory activities and characterized in mathematical terms. Three lectures, one four-hour laboratory each week. Prerequisites: CHM-301 with minimum grade of C. Permission of instructor if prerequisites are not satisfied. [4 credits]

CHM-305 Instrumental Analysis

Examines principles and practices of analytical chemistry using instrumentation. Includes spectroscopic, chromatographic and electrometric techniques. Topics covered include visible, ultraviolet, infrared and atomic spectroscopies; gas and liquid chromatographies; potentiometric, voltammetric and polarographic methods; nuclear magnetic and mass spectrometries; and computer simulations. Analysis of data and presentation of results in journal article format are important features of the course. (Analysis graphics and spreadsheet software are used for this activity.) Three lectures and one four-hour laboratory each week. Prerequisites: CHM-210 and CHM-303 with a minimum grade of C or permission of instructor. [4 credits]

CHM-350 Chemical Literature

Designed to familiarize the student with technical writings, peer-review of publications, the major reference works and journals of chemistry, and to develop skills in effective use of the literature. The course covers effective use of chemistry reference works, databases, abstracts and journals; strategies for online searches; construction and use of bibliographies; proficient use of computer technology and software; analysis and evaluation of chemistry literature. Students use online searching of Chemical Abstracts and other electronic databases via computer and engage in information retrieval using a variety of sources and the Internet. One meeting per week; significant number of out-of-class task-oriented assignments. Co-requisite: 300- or 400-level CHM course or permission of instructor. [1 credit]

CHM-450 Chemistry Seminar

Includes presentations about internship experiences, laboratory research and literature findings of current topics in chemistry. In this capstone course, students learn to construct and deliver effective technical presentations. Students attend chemistry seminars or professional meetings given at area institutions as part of this course. Evaluations and summaries of talks are required. Students give a formal presentation to faculty, guests and students during the department's Spring Seminar Series. One meeting per week. Prerequisite: chemistry major; CHM-350. [1 credit]

COM-106 Fundamentals of Oral Communication

Cultivates oral communication skill for non-majors, with emphasis on improving speaking and listening skills. Analyzes factors affecting oral communication with self, in dyads, small groups, the public arena, organizations, mass media, and among members of differing cultural backgrounds. Practical experience in delivering speeches and briefings. Fulfills the general education requirement in oral communication. [3 credits]

ECO-211 Introduction to Macroeconomics

Focuses on the United States economy and its relations with the world. Examines how interactions among consumers, businesses, government and the rest of the world impact economic growth, inflation, unemployment and business cycles. Investigates the impact of monetary and fiscal policies on the overall performance of the economy. Fulfills general education requirement in social science. [3 credits]

ENG-101 College Writing

Provides students with an understanding that clear thinking is fundamental to clear writing. It also demonstrates every stage of the composing process: generating and organizing ideas, prewriting and drafting, critiquing, revising, final editing and proofreading. In addition, students work to accomplish clarity, unity, coherence and emphasis in sentences, in paragraphs, and in the overall structure of an essay. They develop techniques of style and tone toward more fluent and appealing prose and strive to sharpen their analytical, critical and editing skills by interacting with other students about their own writing and about the writing of professionals. Students learn to use standard English and develop a sensitivity to sentence structure and diction and to appreciate effectively written prose and recognize characteristics that make such prose effective. To fulfill the general education requirement in composition a minimum grade of C is required. [3 credits]

IDS-100 Perspectives on Education and Culture

Assists first-year students in making a successful transition to college life. The course has three overlapping themes: becoming an intentional learner, becoming a Notre Dame woman, and acquiring global and intercultural fluency. Each student will examine and reflect upon various aspects of her life, including her relationship to other students, the institution and the community (understanding culture, appreciating diversity). Students will have the opportunity to develop personal, academic, and leadership skills and habits that will enhance their college experiences and promote lifelong learning. Required for first-year traditional age students and transfer students with fewer than 12 credits. [3 credits]

LSP-101 Beginning Spanish I

Develops the ability to understand, speak, read and write in Spanish. Enhances awareness and understanding of the Spanish-speaking world through presentation of authentic material. LSP-101 is for students with no prior experience in Spanish. Laboratory required. [3 credits]

LSP-102 Beginning Spanish II

Develops the ability to understand, speak, read and write in Spanish. Enhances awareness and understanding of the Spanish-speaking world through presentation of authentic material. Laboratory required. [3 credits]

LSP-103 Intermediate Spanish

Develops the four language skills through a review of grammar and readings based on cultural material. Laboratory required. Fulfills the general education language requirement. Prerequisite: LSP-102 or placement. [3 credits]

MAT-211 Calculus I

Introduces functions, limits, continuity, differential calculus of polynomial, rational, exponential and logarithmic functions, as well as basic integration techniques. Applications are considered throughout the course with an emphasis on the life sciences. Weekly laboratory is an integral part of the course. Graphing calculators used to explore topics covered. Fulfills the general education requirement in mathematics Prerequisite: strong high school algebra background or successful completion of MAT-107. [4 credits]

MAT-212 Calculus II

Studies trigonometric functions, integration by parts and tables, improper integrals, functions of two variables, partial derivatives, double integrals, differential equations, geometric and power series, basic convergence tests, Taylor polynomials and series, and Fourier polynomials and series. Applications are considered throughout the course with an emphasis on the life sciences. Weekly laboratory is an integral part of the course. Graphing calculator is used to explore topics covered. Prerequisite: Calculus I or placement into MAT-212. [4 credits]

MAT-215 Basic Statistics

Introduces the basic ideas of statistics: descriptive statistics, central tendency variability, probability distributions, sampling, estimation, hypothesis testing, correlation and regression, multinomial experiments, contingency tables and analysis of variance. A statistical software package is used. Designed for students in a variety of fields that rely on regular statistical analysis in decision-making. Fulfills general education requirement in mathematics. Prerequisite: A strong algebraic background or successful completion of MAT 100 or MAT 103 is recommended. [3 credits]

PHL-201 Introduction to Philosophy

Studies some of the major issues that have intrigued reflective people from time immemorial: How do we know? What is human nature? Is there life after death? Where did the universe originate? We will evaluate replies suggested from the time of Plato to the 20th century. Fulfills general education requirement for 200-level course. [ 3 credits ]

PHL-330 Ethics

Introduces contemporary moral issues in light of systems suggested by major thinkers such as Aristotle, J. S. Mill and Kant. Includes considerations of topics such as abortion, euthanasia, cloning and capital punishment. Prerequisite: 200-level philosophy course. Fulfills general education requirements for 300/400-level and values. [ 3 credits ]

PHL-339 Medical Ethics

Evaluates the traditional foundations of moral theory in the West, with special emphasis on issues in medical ethics. Prerequisites: 200-level philosophy course. Fulfills general education requirements for 300/400-level course and values. [ 3 credits ]

PHRD-300 Foundations for Pharmacy Practice

The purpose of this course is to provide students with the foundational concepts and skills needed to practice pharmacy in the 21st Century as the role of the pharmacist expands and continues to change. In addition to one's knowledge of the scientific basis of practice, the ability to communicate and be an effective team member is critical to the pharmacist's role as an educator, clinician and member of the health care team. As such, the processes of self and groupassessment, team development and the use of effective communication strategies will be introduced in this course and reinforced throughout the curriculum. Application of these processes will occur through lecture, discussions, assignments, role-playing and case studies. Lecture two hours per week. [ 2 credits ]

PHRD-301 Pharmaceutical Calculations

Accurately performing pharmaceutical calculations is a critical component in providing patient care in every pharmacy practice environment. This course explores the various methods used to perform pharmaceutical calculations required for the usual dosage determinations and solution preparation. This course is an introduction to pharmaceutical prescriptions, the basic technique of calculating, weighing and measuring the ingredients involved in the formulations of various dosage forms. In addition, it provides knowledge in systems of weights and measures, Latin terms, reducing and enlarging formulas, ratio and proportions, various expressions of concentration, intravenous flow rates and dilution factors. Emphasis will also be placed on the skills involved in interpreting prescription and medication orders, and also identifying prescription errors and omissions. Lecture one hour per week with a problem-solving workshop one hour per week. [ 2 credits ]

PHRD-302 Pharmacy and the U. S. Healthcare System

This course provides students with a broad overview of the organization, delivery and financing of medical and pharmaceutical care in the U.S. The impact of state and federal policies on the practice and economics of pharmacy practice and the role of the pharmacist in health care legislation will be discussed. Lecture three hours per week. [ 3 credits ]

PHRD-303 Pharmaceutics I

This is the first of a two-semester course sequence designed to teach students the basic principles and application of physio-chemical principles necessary for the design, development and preparation of pharmaceutical dosage forms. Students will develop the basic skills and techniques necessary for the compounding of pharmaceutical delivery systems, the appropriate evaluation, documentation and labeling of prescriptions and the mathematical calculations essential to compounding. Lecture three hours per week, laboratory three hours per week. Co-requisite: PHRD 301 Pharmaceutical Calculations[ 4 credits ]

PHRD-304 Pharmacist Care Lab I

This is the first of a six-semester sequence designed to integrate material from the curriculum and introduce selected practice related topics. The goal is for students to develop the ability to apply information as well as practice skills that are taught throughout the curriculum. Emphasis is placed on the use of active learning strategies, case studies, role-plays and presentations in order to engage students in the learning process. Students are expected to synthesize information at increasing levels of complexity as they progress through the course sequence. Early introductory pharmacy practice experiences will also be incorporated into Pharmacist Care Lab I. Laboratory three hours per week. [ 2 credits ]

PHRD-305 Biochemistry

This course will provide students with a fundamental understanding of the structure, function and catabolism of biomolecules including carbohydrates, lipids, proteins and nucleic acids. Topics covered will include; bioenergetics and metabolism, genes and chromosomes, DNA and RNA metabolism, regulation of gene expression and recombinant DNA technology. Lecture four hours per week. [ 4 credits ]

PHRD-306 Pharmacist Care Lab II

This is the second of a six-semester sequence designed to integrate material from the curriculum and introduce selected practice related topics. The goal is for students to develop the ability to apply information as well as practice skills that are taught throughout the curriculum. Emphasis is placed on the use of active learning trategies, case studies, role-plays and presentations in order to engage students in the learning process. Students are expected to synthesize information at increasing levels of complexity as they progress through the course sequence. Early introductory pharmacy practice experiences will also be incorporated into Pharmacist Care Lab II. Laboratory three hours per week. Pre-requisite: PHRD 304 Pharmacist Care Lab I. Co-requisite: PHRD-413 and 414: Pharmacotherapeutics I and II. [ 2 credits ]

PHRD-307 Applied Biomedical Sciences Workshop

This course utilizes a small group, problem-based learning approach to teach students the interrelationship between and application of basic biomedical sciences principles to disease pathology, pharmacology, pharmacogenetics, and drug therapy. Students will be engaged in a workshop two hours per week and formative assessment one hour per week. [ 3 credits ]

PHRD-308 Developing the Leader Within

As a health care professional, the pharmacist must be able to take a leadership role within his/her own practice, profession and community at large. This course will provide students with the opportunity for self-exploration, exploration of leadership models, and discussion of the relevance of political advocacy to pharmacy practice. This course will incorporate the communication, teamwork and self and group assessment skills that are introduced in Foundations for Pharmacy Practice. Pre-requisite: PHRD 300 Foundations for Pharmacy Practice. Lecture and application two hours per week. [ 2 credits ]

PHRD-309 Immunology

This course is an introduction to the organization, function and regulation of the immune system including the basic properties of humoral and cell-mediated immune responses, antigen and antibody structure and function, effector mechanisms, complement, major histocompatibility complexes, and cytotoxic responses. The role of these basic immunology principles in immuno deficiencies, auto-immune disorders, hypersensitivity reactions, immunity issues associated with transplantation, cancer and antibody based drug therapy will also be covered. Lecture three hours per week. Co-requisite: PHRD-413: Pharmacotherapeutics. [ 3 credits ]

PHRD-310 Care of Diverse Populations

This first public health course will introduce the socioeconomic, cultural, ethnic, geographic, and other variables which shape healthcare practice and perception. Students will become versed in common practices, myths, barriers, trends, resources, and care principles of diverse populations. An emphasis will be placed on the development of cultural competence such that students will be able to optimally work with diverse patient populations. Students will be required to participate in community based experiences that supports the course learning goals and objectives. Lecture three hours per week. [ 3 credits ]

PHRD-311 Pharmaceutics II

This is the second of a two-semester course sequence designed to teach students the basic principles and application of physio-chemical principles necessary for the design, development and preparation of pharmaceutical dosage forms. Students will develop the basic skills and techniques necessary for the compounding of pharmaceutical delivery systems, the appropriate evaluation, documentation, and labeling of prescriptions and the mathematical calculations essential to compounding. This course will build on the concepts introduced in Pharmaceutics I. Pre-requisite: PHRD 303 Pharmaceutics I. Lecture three hours per week, laboratory three hours per week. [ 4 credits ]

PHRD-312 Pharmacy Practice Management

This course provides students with an understanding of financial and operations management as it relates to pharmacy practices in community, hospital and other practice settings. Topics such as inventory control, pricing, marketing, business plan development for new services, and management of innovative changes in pharmacy practice will be included. Lecture three hours per week. [ 3 credits ]

PHY-101 General Physics I

Studies the fundamental physical laws of nature and their use in understanding natural phenomena. Course provides a knowledge base for study in all areas of science and mathematics. Topics include kinematics, dynamics of motion, Newton's laws, rotational mechanics and conservation of energy and momentum. Development of the concepts of vector algebra and calculus are provided as needed. Three lectures, one three-hour laboratory weekly. Fulfills general education requirement in natural science. [4 credits]

PHY-102 General Physics II

Continues studies of the fundamental physical laws of nature and their use in understanding natural phenomena. Topics include classical wave motion, acoustics, optics, electricity and magnetism. Development of the concepts of vector algebra and calculus are provided as needed. Three lectures, one three-hour laboratory weekly. [4 credits]

RST-201 Introduction to Biblical Studies

Introduces the Hebrew and Christian Scriptures of the Judeo-Christian tradition, exploring their historical and literary contexts, as well as interpretations of religious meaning. Presents modern methods of biblical study, including Roman Catholic, Protestant and Jewish scholarship. Fulfills general education requirement for 200-level religious studies. [3 credits]